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ENGINE/MOTOR *DELETED*

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by big k5, Jan 11, 2004.

  1. big k5

    big k5 Registered Member

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    Post deleted by big k5
     
  2. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    Re: ENGINE/MOTOR

    We had this discussion a month or two ago...

    Motor
    [ QUOTE ]
    mo·tor ( P ) Pronunciation Key (mtr)
    n.
    Something, such as a machine or an engine, that produces or imparts motion.
    A device that converts any form of energy into mechanical energy, especially an internal-combustion engine or an arrangement of coils and magnets that converts electric current into mechanical power.
    A motor vehicle, especially an automobile: “It was a night of lovers. All along the highway... motors were parked and dim figures were clasped in revery” (Sinclair Lewis).

    adj.
    Causing or producing motion: motor power.
    Driven by or having a motor.
    Of or for motors or motor vehicles: motor oil.
    Of, relating to, or designating nerves that carry impulses from the nerve centers to the muscles.
    Involving or relating to movements of the muscles: motor coordination; a motor reflex.

    v. mo·tored, mo·tor·ing, mo·tors
    v. intr.
    To drive or travel in a motor vehicle.

    v. tr.
    To carry by motor vehicle.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [Middle English motour, prime mover, from Latin mtor, from mtus, past participle of movre, to move. See meu- in Indo-European Roots.]

    [Buy it]
    Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
    Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


    motor

    ( P ) motor: log in for this definition of motor and other entries in Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary, available only to Dictionary.com Premium members.


    Source: Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary, © 2002 Merriam-Webster, Inc.


    motor

    \Mo"tor\, n. [L., fr. movere, motum, to move.] 1. One who, or that which, imparts motion; a source of mechanical power.

    2. (Mach.) A prime mover; a machine by means of which a source of power, as steam, moving water, electricity, etc., is made available for doing mechanical work.


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    motor

    \Mo"tor\, Motory \Mo"to*ry\, Motorial \Mo*to"ri*al\, a. [L. motorius that has motion. See Motor, n.] Causing or setting up motion; pertaining to organs of motion; -- applied especially in physiology to those nerves or nerve fibers which only convey impressions from a nerve center to muscles, thereby causing motion.


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    motor

    Diesel engine \Die"sel en`gine\ or motor \mo`tor\ [After Dr. Rudolf Diesel, of Munich, the inventor.] A type of internal-combustion engine in which the air drawn in by the suction stroke is so highly compressed that the heat generated ignites the fuel (usually crude oil), the fuel being automatically sprayed into the cylinder under pressure. The Diesel engine has a very high thermal efficiency.


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    motor

    \Mo"tor\, n. A motor car; an automobile. [Colloq.]


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    motor

    adj 1: conveying information to the muscles from the CNS; "motor nerves" [syn: centrifugal, motor(a)] 2: involving or relating to movements of the muscles; "motor coordination"; "a motor reflex"; "motor paralysis" 3: causing or able to cause motion; "a motive force"; "motive power"; "motor energy" [syn: motive(a)] n : converts other forms of energy into mechanical energy and so imparts motion v : travel in a vehicle [syn: drive]

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Engine
    [ QUOTE ]
    en·gine ( P ) Pronunciation Key (njn)
    n.

    A machine that converts energy into mechanical force or motion.
    Such a machine distinguished from an electric, spring-driven, or hydraulic motor by its use of a fuel.

    A mechanical appliance, instrument, or tool: engines of war.
    An agent, instrument, or means of accomplishment.
    A locomotive.
    A fire engine.
    Computer Science. A search engine.

    tr.v. en·gined, en·gin·ing, en·gines
    To equip with an engine or engines.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [Middle English engin, skill, machine, from Old French, innate ability, from Latin ingenium. See gen- in Indo-European Roots.]

    [Buy it]
    Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
    Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


    engine

    \En"gine\, n. [F. engin skill, machine, engine, L. ingenium natural capacity, invention; in in + the root of gignere to produce. See Genius, and cf. Ingenious, Gin a snare.] 1. (Pronounced, in this sense, ????.) Natural capacity; ability; skill. [Obs.]

    A man hath sapiences three, Memory, engine, and intellect also. --Chaucer.

    2. Anything used to effect a purpose; any device or contrivance; an agent. --Shak.

    You see the ways the fisherman doth take To catch the fish; what engines doth he make? --Bunyan.

    Their promises, enticements, oaths, tokens, and all these engines of lust. --Shak.

    3. Any instrument by which any effect is produced; especially, an instrument or machine of war or torture. ``Terrible engines of death.'' --Sir W. Raleigh.

    4. (Mach.) A compound machine by which any physical power is applied to produce a given physical effect.

    Engine driver, one who manages an engine; specifically, the engineer of a locomotive.

    Engine lathe. (Mach.) See under Lathe.

    Engine tool, a machine tool. --J. Whitworth.

    Engine turning (Fine Arts), a method of ornamentation by means of a rose engine.

    Note: The term engine is more commonly applied to massive machines, or to those giving power, or which produce some difficult result. Engines, as motors, are distinguished according to the source of power, as steam engine, air engine, electro-magnetic engine; or the purpose on account of which the power is applied, as fire engine, pumping engine, locomotive engine; or some peculiarity of construction or operation, as single-acting or double-acting engine, high-pressure or low-pressure engine, condensing engine, etc.


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    engine

    \En"gine\, v. t. 1. To assault with an engine. [Obs.]

    To engine and batter our walls. --T. Adams.

    2. To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.

    3. (Pronounced, in this sense, ?????.) To rack; to torture. [Obs.] --Chaucer.


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    engine

    n 1: converts thermal energy to mechanical work 2: something used to achieve a purpose: "an engine of change" 3: self-propelled engine used to draw trains along railway tracks [syn: locomotive, locomotive engine, railway locomotive]


    Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University


    engine



    <jargon> 1. A piece of hardware that encapsulates some
    function but can't be used without some kind of front end.
    Today we have, especially, "print engine": the guts of a
    laser printer.

    2. An analogous piece of software; notionally, one that does a
    lot of noisy crunching, such as a "database engine", or
    "search engine".

    The hackish senses of "engine" are actually close to its
    original, pre-Industrial-Revolution sense of a skill, clever
    device, or instrument (the word is cognate to "ingenuity").
    This sense had not been completely eclipsed by the modern
    connotation of power-transducing machinery in Charles
    Babbage's time, which explains why he named the
    stored-program computer that he designed in 1844 the
    "Analytical Engine".

    [Jargon File]

    (1996-05-31)



    Source: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © 1993-2003 Denis Howe


    engine

    n. 1. A piece of hardware that encapsulates some
    function but can't be used without some kind of front end. Today
    we have, especially, `print engine': the guts of a laser printer.
    2. An analogous piece of software; notionally, one that does a lot
    of noisy crunching, such as a `database engine'.

    The hacker senses of `engine' are actually close to its original,
    pre-Industrial-Revolution sense of a skill, clever device, or
    instrument (the word is cognate to `ingenuity'). This sense had not
    been completely eclipsed by the modern connotation of
    power-transducing machinery in Charles Babbage's time, which
    explains why he named the stored-program computer that he designed
    in 1844 the `Analytical Engine'.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Basically all Engines are run on some kind of fuel. All Engines are Motors. Some Motors are Engines but not all of them (electric and hydraulic motors are not Engines).
     
  3. big k5

    big k5 Registered Member

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    Re: ENGINE/MOTOR

    I didn't realize that there was a discussion a month or two ago I'm new to the site (11/03)
     
  4. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    Re: ENGINE/MOTOR

    Dont worry about it. Most topics come around more than once on a site like this. Hard for everyone to see every post /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     

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