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Engine Oil Analysis

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by johnny reb, Jan 16, 2001.

  1. johnny reb

    johnny reb 1/2 ton status

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    Has anyone ever had this done? I was thinking of having it done on my oil after my new 350 overheated and the tranny blew out. Amsoil offers a test for around $20. They send you a sample kit and then you send it back to them. Then they give you a written report on the condition of your oil and any repair recommendations. They claim that they can tell the condition of the engine internals. Any other companies out there that do this? Or would I be wasting my money?
     
  2. k5king

    k5king 1/2 ton status

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    hey, a friend of mine uses this test once a month on his peterbilt while changing the oil.....it is a very good test to do,,they send you back very helpful info on what stuff is in your oil..
    he uses it to see how far he can drive with the same oil in his in his rig(trying to keep down maintenance costs)..
    if you do it you should at least do it three or four times to make sure you have accurate results..(3 or 4 oil changes)
    sometimes you get high readings on a single test and the next one will be nothing...
    they also do tranny's and rearend oil i believe...
    good luck:)

    ANYBODY LOSE THEIR JEEP????????[​IMG]
    I JUST FOUND ONE UNDER MY BLAZER!!!![​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  3. sluggo45acp

    sluggo45acp 1/2 ton status

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    I HAVE TO AGREE IF YOU ARE GOING TO DO OIL ANALYSIS YOU NEED TO DO AT LEAST 3 SAMPLES TO ESTABLISH A TREND FOR YOUR ENGINE. AS AN AIRCRAFT MECHANIC I USE OIL ANALYSIS ALL THE TIME TO MONITOR ENGINE CONDITION. SOMETHING ELSE YOU MIGHT WANT TO TRY IS CUT OPEN YOUR OIL FILTER AND INSPECT IT FOR METAL. YOU CAN US A MUFFLER/TAILPIPE CHAIN TYPE CUTTER TO OPEN THE FILTER. AIRCRAFT FILTERS ARE REQUIRED TO BE CUT AND INSPECTED AT EVERY OIL CHANGE.

    If everything works it aint a real truck
     
  4. FWP

    FWP CRS

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    I agree with both replies. But, is it worth it?... I don't think it is. Auto motors are reliable enough, and if there is a problem, what are you going to do- probably rebuild it anyway. You will know when that time is- generally, without oil analysis. It is helpful and a cost savings on expensive facility equipment, crucial machines, aircraft etc. Just my .02

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Bone85K5

    Bone85K5 1/2 ton status

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  6. Woodman89

    Woodman89 Registered Member

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    I agree with everyones response so far. I use to work at a fluid analysis lab for caterpillar. As mentioned you need to take at least 3 samples (the more the better) to get a trend going. Most of the machines that we tested were heavy equipment or a tractor trailer motor. Rarely would we get anything that was gas, and we were the only one around doing this. It makes sense for the high dollar machines that are making money when they are running. I would have to agree with FWP on this one. I dont think that it is cost effective:
    1. You need to get a trend going - after taking samples for 3-4 oil changes, how much time has passed. A year? Lots can happen in a year.
    2. Once you have the trend you will have spent like 100 bucks on samples. Take that money and spend it on something else for your truck (like gasoline).
    3. having first hand experience working in an oil lab I think that the tests that they do are not that useful for gas motors.

    Basically, analyzing oil can be done at home:
    1. Is there coolant in it?
    2. Does it smell burned?
    3. Is there chunks in the filter?
    If no to all of the above, youre all set.
     

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