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Excessive smoking, need help

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by levib, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. levib

    levib Registered Member

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    I have a 87 K5 with the 6.2 in it, and on start up its started smoking a ton. It smokes less as it warms up, but still to much and a lot more than it used to. I'm not a mechanic but I can usually fix my truck and I was looking for suggestions as to what could be causing the problem, and how to check it.
     
  2. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    Is it getting colder down there? Diesels usually smoke more when the motor is cold. As long as it is still normal after it warms up it should be fine.
     
  3. levib

    levib Registered Member

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    Well it's a large cloud of white smoke and it comes out both sides of the dual exaust. It's not due to the cold, it was doing it when it was warmer but I didnt have time to work on it because of school so it's been in the driveway since.
     
  4. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    ok... that sounds a little different than your first post. White smoke may be coolant/water. Have you been loosing coolant?
     
  5. painterbccc

    painterbccc Registered Member

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    My 1988 6.2 smokes like that sometimes. I keep eye on oil and water levels. Both stay full. I was buying fuel at big station. I started buying fuel at a small store. after about a tank of fuel at small store it had quit with light colored smoke. Was in town and needed fuel and got some at big station. Sure enough it started light color smoke. I've been wondering if they are pouring something in the diesel fuel now that it costs more than gas. I guess the joke is on us. Thinning old used oil with old cooking oil. There lets see if that will work. Look at the consumer they will buy anything.
     
  6. levib

    levib Registered Member

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    I think I can rule out burning coolant. I've been watching and havent noticed a loss of coolant. How to I narrow it down between timing and incomplete burn?
     
  7. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

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    I had the same problem.....my truck started and ran just fine, but in the mornings, it would blow a huge cloud of white smoke, and then after it was warmed up, would still smoke some. A properly running 6.2L should not smoke at all during normal operating temperatures.

    I found a broken piston ring on my engine, as well as worn, tapered cylinders, causing low compression.

    I would do a compression check on your engine, and perhaps have the injectors tested at a fuel shop.

    Casey
     
  8. levib

    levib Registered Member

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    As far as compression check goes, can I use a gas motor compression tester or do I need a diesel one? What compression should it have? And is the only way to test the injectors at a shop?
     
  9. afroman006

    afroman006 1/2 ton status

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    The following info has been stolen from David (AgDieseler) and reprinted by me without his expressed permission.

    As far as testing the injectors, you can do that at home. With the engine running, loosen the fuel line at the injector for every cylinder individually. As you loosen the line, fuel should start squirting out prety good at some point. When this happens, you will notice the motor sound slightly different, cause its not getting fuel to one cylinder. If there is fuel squirting out of the line and the engine does not change at all when you disconnect the line, that indicates a bad injector. If there is no fuel squirting out, you have either a clogged fuel filter or a bad lift or injection pump.

    You will need a special diesel conpression tester.
     

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