Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

explain shackle flip

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by lowharley, Mar 19, 2003.

  1. lowharley

    lowharley Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2003
    Posts:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    I see how the shakle flip can help with axle wrap by decreasing the need for lift blocks, but how does a shackle flip improve articulation?
     
  2. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2000
    Posts:
    4,227
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Carbondale Colorado
    Only by letting you run a flatter, softer, spring. Otherwise you don't get any appreciable gain. There are some handling differences between a flat soft spring and a heavily arched soft spring and typically the flatter spring handles better. That's about it. No pixie dust involved.
     
  3. Hardcore

    Hardcore 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2003
    Posts:
    458
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    Are the 2.5" and 4" kits the same as far as flex. I'm guessing the 4" kit just puts the mount lower relative to the frame?

    The reason I'm asking is I'm trying to decide between 4" springs and 2.5" flip or 2.5" springs and 4" flip. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  4. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2000
    Posts:
    4,227
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Carbondale Colorado
    We always recommend the taller flip and shorter spring. In most cases, the shorter the arch, the easier they move. The only time I would go the other route is if it was going to be a buggy or bobbed rig where the shackle would end up the last ditch ground clearance point, then the shorter flip and taller spring might be worth the little gain in departure angle. On a regular full body vehicle, departure angle is set by other points and the 4" is the way to go.
     
  5. BJarvis354

    BJarvis354 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2002
    Posts:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New York City
    I am thinking of BDS or other brand 2.5" Springs in the front and a 2.5" Shackle flip with a Zero-Rate in the rear to increase my articulation. I am running completely stock on 32s and I will keep those until they run down. Will this give me 2.5" of travel of more? I think 2.5" is right for me since 4" would create problems getting into garages here in the city...But maybe I am wrong? Any advice? I want better trail performance without going to BIG tires...33" is probably the max unfortunately.

    Brady

    Brady
     
  6. 88Silverado

    88Silverado 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Posts:
    2,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Quartz Hill, So. Cal
    Thats similar to what im thinking. Im running 33's, want to go to the BDS 3" and am wondering if going to a 4" shackle flip with stock springs is whats needed to make it level and not sag too bad when loaded. Whats the thoughts?
     
  7. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2000
    Posts:
    4,227
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Carbondale Colorado
    Sounds like you guys need to check out our "burly 'burb" project. It's built right along the lines of what you're talking about. 3" fronts, 4" flip in the rear and since it's a 'burb, it has a rear zero rate too. It worked really well with 33's and with some trimming 35's are OK.
     
  8. BJarvis354

    BJarvis354 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2002
    Posts:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New York City
    Well, that sounds like the right plan...But you know how lifts go, 4 inch springs might be more like 5" in reality! It sounds like the ORD flip is a true 4" though. But I am going to add 1" zero-rates just to be sure my rear isn't saggy.

    Brady
     

Share This Page