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Floor replacement...what sheet thickness?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by MaxCrack, Oct 28, 2004.

  1. MaxCrack

    MaxCrack 1/2 ton status

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    I am replacing the front flooring as it is in bad shape. I was thinking of using diamond plate. What gauge would be strong enough but not too heavy. I was thinking 1/8th inch would be strong enough, but is it going to add too much weight? If I use thinner diamond plate, is it possible to run a bead in it to stiffen it up?
     
  2. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    16g is plenty at around 0.0625 thick and a bead or two will help. Can't really roll diamond plate or any tread plate very well because it will hang up in the rollers.
     
  3. jjlaughner

    jjlaughner 3/4 ton status

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    Diamond plate floors add weight down low... /forums/images/graemlins/whistling.gif

    If your just replacing the front floor sections I dont think you'd add enough weight to worry about even using 1/8". Like bad dog said use 16gauge and roll some beads in it.
     
  4. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I've used everything from stovepipe to refrigerator skins,and aluminum roof flashing to 16 gauge galvanized ductwork.Thicker is better,but a lot harder to work with.I think the best choice is the 16 gauge galvanized stuff--but dont weld it indoors--do it outside with a fan blowing,and dont be suprised if you get the "zinc chills" despite all the precautions,but its worth it--the galvanized patches I put in all my vehicles still looked like new when the surrounding sheet metal rusted away again.I've learned to overlap the rust holes at least 2 inches if you dont want to add more to the patch in a few years. /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
     
  5. akbound

    akbound 1/2 ton status

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    I am a Bioenvironmental Engineer in the Air Force (worker health and safety) and teach industrial hygiene to new officer and enlisted personnel. Please read the following:

    Zinc Metal Fume Fever

    OVERVIEW

    Metal Fume Fever is the name for an illness that is caused primarily by exposure to zinc oxide fume (ZnO) in the workplace. The main cause of this exposure is usually breathing the fumes from welding, cutting, or brazing on galvanized metal. Metal Fume Fever is an acute allergic condition experienced by many welders during their occupational lifetimes. Studies indicate that the most common cause of metal fume fever I overexposure to zinc fumes from welding, burning, or brazing galvanized steel. Since galvanized steel is more and more common in industry, the chances of welders having to work on it are occurring more frequently all the time. Other elements, such as copper and magnesium, may cause similar effects.

    EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE

    Zinc oxide fumes cause a flu-like illness called Metal Fume Fever. Symptoms of Metal Fume Fever include headache, fever, chills, muscle aches, thirst, nausea, vomiting, chest soreness, fatigue, gastrointestinal pain, weakness, and tiredness. The symptoms usually start several hours after exposure; the attack may last 6 to 24 hours. Complete recovery generally occurs without intervention within 24 to 48 hours. Metal Fume Fever is more likely to occur after a period away from the job (after weekends or vacations). High levels of exposure may cause a metallic or sweet taste in the mouth, dry and irritated throat, thirst, and coughing at the time of the exposure. Several hours after exposure, a low-grade fever (seldom higher than 102º F or 39º C). Then comes sweating and chills before temperature returns to normal in 1 to 4 hours. If you encounter these symptoms, contact a physician and have a medical examination / evaluation. There is no information in the literature regarding the effects of long-term exposure to zinc oxide fumes. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif

    If you have any more questions about how your hobbies or jobs may be adversely affecting you please let me know.
     
  6. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I try my best not to breathe in any zinc fumes--after my first exposure to welding galvanized steel in the floors of one truck I had a long time ago(I had no ventilation,but I was outside--a lot of "smoke" was trapped under the dash while I was welding the patch near the kick panels).I didnt notice any ill effects until later that day-I got bad stomach cramps-I spent the following 12 hours real close to the toilet--zinc must be a good cure for constipation--it cleaned me right out!.Now I know better,and do all I can to not get a dose of those fumes,I grind the zinc off before welding(it welds much easier that way too)and use a fan to move the fumes away,and do it outside.I like the way galvanized metal doesnt rust,even when left out to the weather unprotected.I wish GM had made the floors and rocker panels out of galvanized steel--then we wouldnt have to go thru all this!. /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
     
  7. akbound

    akbound 1/2 ton status

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    Just an informed suggestion: get a respirator for ALL welding. Metal fumes of all types are BAD.
     
  8. elacruze

    elacruze 1/2 ton status

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    I just finished replacing most of the bottom of the cab of my '85 K. I used replacement panels from J.C. Whitney and I am quite pleased with the materials and quality-they're far better than I expected for the price. I'm certain that they'll outlast the rest of the old stuff.
    I don't have a pic of the finished project yet.
    [​IMG]
     

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