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for those of you in extreme cold weather states

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Bandit175, Aug 15, 2003.

  1. Bandit175

    Bandit175 Registered Member

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    I am moving to Alaska in Nov. and need to know what is involved in installing a winterization kit. It needs to be able to handle -60. Thanks /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif
     
  2. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    At those temps a winterization kit consists of a warm garage for the truck, and a snowmobile. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    I believe the only thing that was changed for the extreme cold was the addition of a block heater. Some styles go into the expansion plugs in the block, and some splice into the lower radiator hose as I recall.

    Personally I'd want something that went into the expansion plug hole, since it's already a potential leak source...the spliced lower hose idea just adds two more potential leak sources.
     
  3. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    You'll definitely want to run a 195 degree thermostat, so the heater will work as good as possible. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif

    You can also block off most of the radiator during the winter, to keep the cold blast of air from overcooling the engine (-60 is COLD!!!)

    You'll also need to run a much higher concentration of antifreeze to deal with those kinds of temps.

    An engine block heater (or two) will also help, at least when you're within reach of a power plug.

    JC Whitney used to sell a propane powered engine coolant heater, but I haven't seen it in quite a while. But that doesn't mean that someone doesn't still make it. I'm sure the folks in Alaska will be able to give you more ideas on winterizing, but it'll probably be a lot cheaper to buy as much of the stuff as you can before you go there. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    Here's an insulation tip that I'm going to try out on both my K5 and my Suburban. Walmart sells some closed-cell foam camping pads. I plan to remove the interior side panels and then glue this padding (about 1/2-inch thick) to the metal sidewalls and then reinstall the interior panels. Heck, you could even stuff some fiberglass house insulation in there if ya wanna get extreme. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    Figuring out a way to insulate the ceiling would also help keep the heat inside. I've seen carpet glued to the fiberglass top on a K5. That would help insulate it and also get rid of the "cave effect" echo inside. /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif
     
  4. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Oh yeah, don't go beating the snot out of your truck when it's that cold out. Most metals become very brittle at those temps, so it's much easier to shatter axles, break frames, etc. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  5. Mastiff

    Mastiff 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I think most people far north, like Fairbanks, also get heater pads that silicone onto the oil pan, the tranny pan and under the battery or batteries. A warm block is good, but the oil and tranny fluid need to be warm, and a battery at -60 doesn't provide much power.
     
  6. Sparky87k5

    Sparky87k5 1/2 ton status

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    Consider using synthetic oils for extreme cold, especially in the engine and gearboxes. At the minimum, go to a thinner engine oil and gearbox lube. At that temperature, you'll need to be certain of keeping moisture out of the fuel, use a product like "Heet" for this. Install dual block heaters, one in each bank and I used to install a small trickle charger wired directly to the battery and spliced into the same cord that was used to connect the block heaters. This way the engine stayed warm, the battery was at full charge and everything started much better. Buy the very best and largest battery you can fit into the battery tray. Having lived in Montana for 12 years, I even used an oil pan heater at times. Magnetic clamp on unit that kept the engine oil warm. To avoid frozen rubber boots around the trans/TC shifters that'll break or crack if moved when temps are -40, let the interior warm up good before driving. I used to shatter the rubber boots around shifters on the company trucks I drove when it hit -45. ALWAYS wear gloves when reaching the outside door handles to get in the truck. Otherwise you can leave your finger prints on the handles. /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif I mean the meaty part of the finger. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif Hope this helps.
     
  7. rugger03

    rugger03 1/2 ton status

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  8. o2bjimmy

    o2bjimmy 1/2 ton status

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    In extreme cold weather also try and be carefull when shutting car doors. The plastic door panels can get to be as brittle as glass. My dad lives in Alaska and every night he puts a electric heat blanket over his drivers door panel. If it shorts out just take the time too get warm by the fire and maybe make some smores /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     

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