Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

For those of you that tow with your K5...

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by MousePowrd, May 10, 2003.

  1. MousePowrd

    MousePowrd 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 7, 2003
    Posts:
    215
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Saginaw, MI
    For this summer and maybe next I will be towing with my Blazer. I have a 25' boat that is over the 6000# GVWR by about 500#. I towed this boat with my 88K5 for a year, and promptly bought a Silverado p/u /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    I have not been working much so that is the reason the Blazer will be in tow duty for a while. My biggest complaint about towing with my 88 was the tongue weight of the trailer caused the rear of the truck to bounce too much, making things scary at times. So I need suggestions to cure this.

    Should I go with stiffer rear shocks, adjustable air shocks or an add a leaf to stiffen the rear (along with the bonus of a little lift)? Any other ideas would be great also.

    Thanks
    Bob
     
  2. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,170
    Likes Received:
    1,380
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    Can you run a weight distributing hitch with a boat trailer? Made a world of difference with our 21 foot camper trailer...

    Rene
     
  3. MousePowrd

    MousePowrd 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 7, 2003
    Posts:
    215
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Saginaw, MI
    Oh yeah, I wouldnt even attempt it without one
     
  4. bigjbear

    bigjbear 1 ton status Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2000
    Posts:
    13,970
    Likes Received:
    451
    Location:
    Marietta GA
    Add-A-Leaf or air bags would help. I would not use air shocks, the stock shock mounts are a known week spot, if you stress them as a suspention member you can almost count on bad things happening. Don't forget the trans cooler
     
  5. MousePowrd

    MousePowrd 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 7, 2003
    Posts:
    215
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Saginaw, MI
    Already have the trans cooler. I would appreciate any suggestions on which add-a-leaf setup to use
     
  6. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2000
    Posts:
    8,946
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Northeast Nevada
    Forget add a leaf or shocks.
    Get some overloads, Weight Dist hitch, Rear sway bar will help a lot too.
    And a big tranny cooler.
    helpersprings.com /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    If yur on a budget I'd go with the weight dist hitch at least.
     
  7. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

    Joined:
    May 30, 2001
    Posts:
    17,669
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    IL, USA
    [ QUOTE ]
    6000# GVWR

    [/ QUOTE ]

    GVWR is not what you're really concerned with when you're talking about a trailer. Gross Vehicle Weight Rating applies to how much your vehicle can weigh by itself.

    Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) is what you're concerned with. To get actual towing capacity, subtract the acutal tow vehicle weight, full of fuel, gear, and passengers, from the GCWR.
     
  8. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    7,385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Atlanta
    [ QUOTE ]
    Oh yeah, I wouldnt even attempt it without one

    [/ QUOTE ]
    You might have the wrong bars then. My 88 454 3/4 burb rode better with 3k behind it and 1000lb bars. If your bars are undersized it will still let the back of the vehicle bounce. It may not even be the rating of the bars but how many links your using. The whole ideal of the leveler bars is you push down the tow vehicle evenly.
    The best way to set the bars is to measure the hight of the bumpers without the trailer. Then hook up the the trailer and adjust the bars till the amount the front of the truck drops is with in 3/4 of an inch of the amout the rear droped. Now if the rear drops 4 inches wheen you hit the truck with the weight your not going to attempt to get the front to drop that much. When you tighten up the bars the rear will come up and the front will go down. So after the bars are tight the rear may have dropped 2 inches and the front dropped down 1.5. Now the real problem is these 4x4 trucks DON'T have a lot of up travel in the front suspension. So your going to find your lifting the rear more then your dropping the front. SO here is where the bounce may come in.
    If your load bars are bending a lot then they are undersized. Most of the time the bars will be about 250lb over the tounge weight works out about right and then you fine tune with the links. Do for a 6500lb boat and trailer it should idealy have about 650lb of tounge weight. 750 might be a little light and you might have better results with 1000lb bars.
    The problem with too stiff of bars is it might beat on the trailer a lot. Boats are built to take a beating so it may be more of a concern with how strong the boat trailer is.

    The last thing is that's a LOT of weight with such a short wheel base. You can't get over that fact. The trailer has a lot of leverage advantage over the tow vehicle. The bounce is magnified because there is so much leverage from the long overhang on the rear of the blazer and the short wheel base.
    That's why it trailered so much better with the truck.
     

Share This Page