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Frame Flex

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by clarkekent, Sep 25, 2001.

  1. clarkekent

    clarkekent Registered Member

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    I've noticed my blazer frame has a lot of flex when driven on unlevel roads. It is even noticeable when just turning the tires. A lot of that flex is transferred to the body, affecting the doors, I even heard the dashboard creaking the last time I went off road.
    Has anyone welded the front crossmember to the frame? Right now it is only bolted. I dont see any reason for allowing removal of the crossmember, so I should be able to weld it, right?
     
  2. arq

    arq 1/2 ton status

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    anyone snap their fiberglass top while flexing. i heard my top go snap crackle but no pop a few times.

    ARQ.

    offroad baja!!!
    1-72 4x4 CST Blazer
    2-71 4x4 CST Blazer
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/ArqDennis>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/ArqDennis</a>
     
  3. Roostr84

    Roostr84 1/2 ton status

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    I thought about this and wondered if you boxed in portions of the frame how it would affect this. I realize alot of guys out their go for the most flex possible but for myself the most offroading around here are mud and fireroads as well as the beach. So otherwise it is has to be a roadworthy vehicle as well. Anybody considered this.

    Chris =)

    I think the exhaust fumes have finally gotten to me!!
     
  4. clarkekent

    clarkekent Registered Member

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    No pop here either, but I've only messed around in the snow with the top on, not too extreme.
    The last few times I went offroad with the top off, the snap, crackle was from the dash / window post area.
     
  5. blazerman

    blazerman Registered Member

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    Never had that problem myself. I ran some moderate trails topless about three weeks ago, and no problems (except for that pesky exhaust leak). Never heard that before with or without the top.

    72 K5 - 33's on stock susp. and lots of rust! But at least it's payed for!!!
     
  6. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    I think the way that most people weld in cross members is to make small stiches with spaces between and not one long bead.My front fenders are broken beside the hinges and my top has large cracks from twisting.Iv thought about doing this to mine.

    A balanced diet is a beer in both hands.<a target="_blank" href=http://community.webshots.com/user/beaterwhang>community.webshots.com/user/beaterwhang</a>
     
  7. Steve_Chin

    Steve_Chin 1/2 ton status

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    Welding the engine crossmember to the frame isn't going to appreciably help reduce frame flex due to chassis torsion. A properly-designed roll cage will help, but it needs to be located properly and properly tied-into the frame.
     
  8. clarkekent

    clarkekent Registered Member

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    I'm not talking about the engine crossmember. I'm talking about the front crossmember, located behind the bottom radiator support. It crosses right at the steering box.
     
  9. Steve_Chin

    Steve_Chin 1/2 ton status

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    That crossmember also isn't going to provide much in the way of structural integrity. In fact, virtually none of the crossmembers add much to prevent chassis torsion since the chassis is a ladder design. You'd do better to add braces that run from the front of the frame to the firewall and then add braces inside the cabin and a roll cage. This would make the chassis very stiff but it'd also lose any crush zones that are present.
     
  10. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    What about the idea I've seen where people use heavy valve springs in the body mounts to allow the mount to stretch when the frame starts to really twist up? Instead of trying to prevent torsional twisting of the frame (which as Mr. Chin pointed out has NO simple answers) just allow the body to move somewhat independently above it. At least you can minimize the effects of the body having to twist just as much as the frame does.....

    Just an idea I saw, and it seemed like a creative way to address the concern.

    -Greg72
     

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