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Frame Mounted Roll Cage

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by cocky, Mar 27, 2000.

  1. cocky

    cocky Registered Member

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    Has any one mounted their roll cage to their frame? If so how? I have heard this will make the cage more solid. It seems like it would since the metal floor board is pretty thin. Also i think this would stiffen up my frame and body which seems like a good idea since this summer i will take my doors off and don't want to tweak my body. Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated.

    Richard
    1970 k5 Blazer
    Don't stand in front of a train naked
     
  2. cocky

    cocky Registered Member

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    Even if nobody has ever done this, does anyone have any ideas?

    Richard
    1970 k5 Blazer
    Don't stand in front of a train naked
     
  3. Eagle86K5

    Eagle86K5 1/2 ton status

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    Being an engineer, I would not tie it to the frame.Long ago I was taught if something was made to bend, then you stop it from bending, something is gonna break. Your frame as well as the whole body is engineered with a certain amount of lateral and longitudinal torsional flex, by attaching a framwork to the existing frame you defeat this flex ability and increase the chances of something breaking.

    <font color=green>Eagle86K5[​IMG]

    <font color=red>Only guy I know that can get out of line in a one car funeral
     
  4. Jason73K5

    Jason73K5 1/2 ton status

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    You're probably right about breaking something , but I'd rather break something on the truck than break my head when the roll cage rips away from the body.
     
  5. Corey-88K5

    Corey-88K5 1/2 ton status

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    AS stated before, all roll cages are bolted/welded to the chassis. Light bars are bolted to the body. If you are worried about chassis flex, stress better artculation. I wouldn't worry about the flex lost by the cage.

    Corey
    88K5

    [​IMG]<font color=blue>Girls Like Guys In Bow Ties</font color=blue>
    <font color=red>http://www.geocities.com/corey_perez
     
  6. Brian 89KBlazer

    Brian 89KBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Well, not to be arguementative, but lots of things that can bend are better off NOT bending. A good example in my industry is utility poles. Sure a pole can support a certain load and withstand a set amount of windloading but allowing it to move is not necessarily a good thing. That's why down guys and anchors are employed throughout.
    But enough of that stuff! I just found an article last night where a company (Mountain Off-Road Enterprises(M.O.R.E.))sells a kit that allows you to tie your roll cage to the frame. It includes outriggers (mounts) that weld to the frame for the cage to bolt to and includes bushings that absorb some of the flexural stresses. My opinion is that the more frame flex can be minimized and suspension flex maximized, the better off structurally the Blazer will be. My only question would be is it better to drill a hole through the body floor and allow the rollcage to pass through to its frame mount (with some kind of gasket around the base to seal the hole and leave room for cage/body flex or should the base of the cage and the frame foot mount sandwich the body between it? The M.O.R.E. kit (for jeeps) sandwiched the body between the two mounts. From what I have read in the past on this board and other sources, most people don't put a lot of faith in body mounted cages because the cage is then only as strong as the body metal it mounts to.

    Good Luck
    Brian
    Still in search of the TBI KING!!

    P.S. I am doing a frame off rebuild this summer and hope to build a complete cage that mounts to the chassis but also passes straight through the dash close to the front A pillars on either side of the window. Hopefully, it'll be documented on Colorado K5 as a project.
     
  7. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    What kinda rollovers are you guys preparing for??
    I don't know about the rest of you but when I go wheelin I ain't goin much more that 5mph and if my rig does roll it most likely won't do a flip right on top of the cage and cause it to punch thru the floor! The roll will be body/cage/body/cage/ etc.....
    Just a thought but the body on my rig has reinforced cross members center and rear that is what my cage bolts too and from the looks of it for the cage to punch thru it would have to be damm hard at 80mph!!
    Thats all i'm done
    Burt4x4

    Rock ON!
     
  8. AZK5

    AZK5 1/2 ton status

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    I agree Burt, my six-point cage is welded to 6"x6"x.125" plates welded to the floor. The plates are located above cross members. I'm not worried about my head. You might be surprised if you look through a racing tech manual like NHRA for cage requirements. They allow you to attach the cage to the floor.
    CB
     

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