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front CV joint questions

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by ssls6, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. ssls6

    ssls6 Registered Member

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    I'm doing a rebuild of my front CV joint. The vehicle is a 72 K5 blazer and the centering yoke, h-member, weld yoke, and ujoints all say spicer. The ujoints measure out to be 1310s. The CV ujoints do not have grease zerks but the front differential does.

    So here is my question. What spicer part numbers should I order? I need 3 new ujoints and a new centering yoke (whole assembly with ball, spring, dust shield, & needle bearings).

    These are the part numbers I found but I don't know if they're right.

    Ujoint 5-153x (quanity 3)
    Ball Centering Kit 211355x (quanity 1)

    The pin diameter of the spicer weld yoke is 0.485. I assume it is OK to put greasable ujoints in the CV unit.
     
  2. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Keep in mind that the stock C/V is not up to the task of turning 35" or larger tires on one of these rigs. That is the reason that Jesse builds 1 ton rated drivelines for these trucks. ALL of our trucks, 1/2, 3/4, and 1 ton alike have 1/2 ton rated front drivelines. This, in my opinion is unacceptable, and why I upgraded. That said, if you intend to keep it, I'd like to run a few ideas by you.

    #1, the last thing you want is cheap, or greasable u joints. You've got a lift and tires so I'd assume you're going to be beating on it. You need the strongest non-greasable joints you can find. 5-785x is the part number for the cold forged joints (no grease fitting). Go with those without question.

    #2, do yourself a favor. Chock your wheels and put your truck in neutral. Jack up your front axle and get the biggest jackstands you've got and put them on the frame near the front axle. Lower the jack and let the axle droop completely and hang. Attempt to spin your front driveshaft and make sure it is not binding. If it is binding and you expect for it to live even in the short term, a limit strap is going to be required to make sure it never bottoms out either the CV or the 1310 joint on the pinion. You may end up being surprised, joints in these driveshafts bind pretty easily in lifted trucks, especially fronts.

    These things will help your front driveshaft live a longer and happier life. The stock front driveshafts in these things are working pretty hard to turn stock tires but it can be done as long as it's not binding. If it's not binding it would have to fail from torque. While not impossible due to it being 1/2 ton rated, this is far less likely than if it were to fail from binding, which would be nearly immediate and catastrophic if it were to occur.
     
  3. solution#1 call offroad unlimited and get straight axle convo!!!
    i used to have ifs and it sucks ballz unless you trully care about that smoooth ride
    i dunno
     
  4. eclipse

    eclipse 1/2 ton status

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    "solution#1 call offroad unlimited and get straight axle convo!!!
    i used to have ifs and it sucks ballz unless you trully care about that smoooth ride
    i dunno"

    IFS? did I read wrong or was he talking about a 72 K5? :confused:
     
  5. im ****in drunk dude!
     
  6. Hossbaby50

    Hossbaby50 3/4 ton status

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    Tim, I love how you preach that 1/2 ton driveshafts won't take the abuse. To a certain extent this is true but only for the most hardcore wheelers or people who mindlessly beat the crap out of there trucks.

    The 1/2 ton driveshafts where in my truck for 20 years. I finally broke the rear one about 6 months ago. It was no fault of the driveshaft though. It was my fault, otherwise that driveshaft would still be in my truck. What I did to my truck (not on purpose mind you) would have taken out a HAD driveshaft or anything else too.

    The 1/2 ton front driveshaft was recently retired to spare duty because the slip joint was getting to loose for my liking. So I got a stock used driveshaft from JekBrown, installed a new ujoint at the pinion end and called it good. It took whatever wheeling Jek put on it and has taken all the wheeling I have put on it without a hitch. I am not a super hardcore wheeler but I put alot more hard trail miles on my truck then most people do.

    1310's don't automatically grenade themselves when you take them 4 wheeling. I know for a fact that Matt (az-k5) has a 1310 ujoint at the front pinion of his D60 and has beat the hell out of his truck and it hasn't let go yet. That is with a doubler, 37's, lots of traction, and a fair amount of right foot. The front shaft in his truck was a 1/2ton shaft we slammed some new ujoints in, cut out the stop tabs and ground down the CV to take more angle. He did eventually break the CV cup, but it was pretty wasted to begin with. He is still running that shaft in his truck now.

    You are correct in saying that binding is the worst enemy of ujoints. If you bind them they will break. If you can keep your stock shafts from binding then they will probably last quite a long time. If you have some radical flex that needs a extra long slipjoint or causes some heavy driveshaft angles by all means get a HAD shaft. If not then run what you got till you break it.

    I personally don't see the point in spending $400 or more dollars on a HAD shaft unless you need one. Most people don't honestly need a HAD shaft. It is a nice piece of mind to have but it is expensive. I have $80 total wrapped up in both my front driveshafts and about $125 in the 2 rear shafts. I did have to make a rear limiting strap setup to keep the rear shaft from binding up but that is no big deal. The only time it would bind up was at full droop of both tires. The axle had to be hanging free in the air to bind. I have less then 1/2 the price of one HAD shaft invested in all 4 driveshafts I have for my truck.
    Harley
     
  7. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I, too, sucessfully and for quite some time ran a 1/2 ton front shaft. I ran into a rash of problems with my setup that eliminated the possiblity of continuing to run it with my D60 and new suspension, so in the trash it went.

    That said, the reason it holds up so well in front shafts is that the rear axle does the majority of the work.

    For someone that understands driveshafts as you do, enough to limit their axle's downtravel (which I have done as well on my front axle to keep my 1410 pinion joint from binding) it's no wonder your 1/2 ton stuff holds up as well as it does. Like I've always said, if it's not binding, it probably won't break. If it's half ton rated, it'll wait its turn to be overstressed and break.

    The honest to God truth is that the majority of rigs out there are on borrowed time with the driveshafts they're running. I know I was, for a number of years. Hell I even blew apart one HAD shaft before I learned.

    That said, others can be made to work. IMO, it wasn't worth it to half ass something this critical again, so I went all the way this time.
     
  8. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    You're mindless pimping of HAD's product is hilarious.
     
  9. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    Well I don't consider running any drivetrain part for years as barrowed time. Dirveshafts are wearable parts, fact of life. If there is movement in it, it is a wearable part. Eventually a HAD shaft, along with every other shaft will wear out. Weather it be u-joints, or the slip, or the ears from regular u-joint replacement it will wear out. Most of our crap is OE parts (15+ years old) with new u-joints. Is it the best no, does it serve its purpose admirably, yes.

    I am currently running a 1310/saginaw CV front (with a blown cup) and have no failures after a good 7 hard runs in the last 4 months. I also run a 1310 on my rear shaft at the t-case and a combo 1310-1350 at the diff. I have blown up one 203 yoke (joint was fine) and twisted another driveshaft (joints were fine). Fred (FWP) runs the 1310 spicer CV and has blown 3 30 spline D60 stubs, along with streatching a set (L&R) of new 35 spline inners/outters.

    There is a lot to be said for the new cold forge spicer joints along with checking for binding before you hammer it.
     
  10. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I agree. I had some real crap hold up for many years and to this day I wonder how.

    What I mean by failure is premature failure. Of course everything will wear out eventually, hell, without religious greasing, my front 42* cv would be done by now.
     

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