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front drive shaft angle

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by twosnvrlose, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    I just put in a 6" lift and the kit from tuff country worked good except the front drive shaft angle is a little out. I was thinking of shifting the front diff about 10-15% to correct this angle problem and I was wondering if there is a product out there to do this or do I have to go to the local machine shop and have some thing made? Also the back sags a little and was thinking of a small block the back is that what thoses zero rates are?
     
  2. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Shims. ORD should be able to get them for you.

    And yes, the zero rates will give you an inch in the rear to cure the sag as long as you are not using blocks now..
     
  3. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    The lift is springs no blocks right now and those shims are they one peice or a whole bunch of small ones? can I get them anywere? or would I be better off just makeing my own from one peice?
     
  4. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Look at the link (the underlined word) - they are one piece and can be had in a variety of degrees. smoe people make them, for the $$ I would just buy the right ones and be done.
     
  5. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    Thanks for your help :bow: such knowledge able people around here
     
  6. goldwing2000

    goldwing2000 Guest

    The only problems with running shims on the front is that you change the caster angle, which affects vehicle stability. You'll notice that even in cbbr's link, it states "Degree shims are generally installed between rear leaf springs and the axle." I don't know how much is too much but use as little shim as possible to get the job done.

    To do it right, you need to cut and rotate the "C" on the end of the tube.

    Worse comes to worse, you can run CV joints at both ends of the shaft.
     
  7. bp71k5

    bp71k5 3/4 ton status Premium Member

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    I think for you're front shaft you can run a pretty big angle since you generally don't go very fast in 4WD. Mine's no where near a proper angle and it's ok. I just unlock the hubs on the freeway. I would drive it a bit and see if you really need to change anything before spending time/money on shims, etc. I did the same lift kit and it's fine for my 71, except I did 6" in rear and 4" in front.
     
  8. Chaddy

    Chaddy 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    The easiest way is to drill out the plug welds and rotate the center section.
     
  9. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    If we are talking a couple of degrees, will the stability be thrown off noticeably as long as the caster setting is the same on both sides?
     
  10. ssped

    ssped 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    The total caster will change a bit but Not significantly. Might actually loosen the stiffness of the steering. Caster is changes the ability to center the wheel. think raked motorcycle. I placed and welded in steel shims and the steering is much better. Easier to turn.
     
  11. goldwing2000

    goldwing2000 Guest

    A couple of degrees is probably fine. My truck actually had some shims under the 6" springs when I bought it and it's ok. But like I said, go with as little as possible. If you shim it too much and your caster goes negative, you're going to be in a hurt locker.

    That's good to know. Same effect but less work!
     
  12. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    No question about that.
     
  13. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    thanks for the info I am going to try some 6 degree shims from a local company the were cheap about $19 cdn and I got some 3" blocks for the back to level out the rear. Thanks again for the info.
     
  14. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Stay away from aluminum shims, particularly thin ones. They break thru the center pin hole and then you've got a mess.
     
  15. ssped

    ssped 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Ditto on that I snapped a set of aluminum 2 deg shims. Get steel for reeelllllll.
     
  16. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    all steel and they are cheap great combo
     

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