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Front drive shaft question?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 1-ton, Feb 3, 2006.

  1. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I just installed some 6” lift springs on the front of my truck, and this has led to an extreme front drive shaft operating angle at the front differential pinion. I have an NP 205 connected to a Dana 60. I am not worried about the drive shaft at the transfer case flange because that side has a double cardan joint, which is designed to take extreme angles, but can the u-joint at the differential pinion side take this kind of angle? There is no way of correcting the angle with out taking to much positive caster out of the front differential. Since most of my wheeling is light duty, and at slow speeds, will the extreme angle be OK? The fastest I ever go might be in 4-HI at about 30 MPH.
     
  2. goldwing2000

    goldwing2000 Guest

    You could always have a double joint put on both ends of the shaft.

    I don't know id the D60 makes the angle worse but I'm running 6" springs on mine and the angle doesn't seem too bad.
     
  3. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I was thinking of that, but I have not seen or heard of anybody doing it yet. I wonder if I could get one for the differential pinion end of my stock drive shaft. I do not do any hardcore wheeling, so my stock shaft would be good enough. can adding a double cardan to the differential pinion side be done without any major modifications?
     
  4. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    ttt
     
  5. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I am like...real surprised ther are no vendors reading posts around here such as this to recommend a solution, and posibly make a sale.
     
  6. mouse

    mouse 1/2 ton status

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    Usually the front shaft is better at handling more extreme angles because we use it at lower speeds. If the CV portion is not binding, and the shaft is long enough, you are probably good to go.
     
  7. Chaddy

    Chaddy 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    You could always do a 2 piece carrier bearing front shaft.
     
  8. perp

    perp 1/2 ton status

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    I heard somewhere that a 1410 joint and yolk on the front diff will take ALOT of angle without failing. may vibrate at higher speeds though. I have not tried it but i am leaning that way too. Just what i heard. call Jesse at High Angle Driveline, he was a good guy to work with on my rear shaft
     
  9. perp

    perp 1/2 ton status

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    You could always cut an rotate the "C's". that is an option that will make your pinion angle primo and leave the castor angle stock. a bit of work but lots have done it, so long as your a good welder
     
  10. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I will try that. I have the front drive shaft out now, and I was going to do the u-joints anyway. I am going to do some clearance grinding on the double cardan couplings too.

    I am not sure what you mean by "C's". Does that mean "axle tubes".
     
  11. perp

    perp 1/2 ton status

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    The C's refers to the inner half of the knuckle at the end of the axles. you can grind out the weld and rotate the inner knuckle around the axle tube (with a BIG hammer, they are also press fit) and then reweld the C's back solid.

    Say you need a 12 degree shim to make your drive line angle perfect, this then rotates the entire front housing and your steering knuckles that same 12 degrees and that is what throws out your castor (by 12 degrees). so if you cut and rotate the inner knuckle the OPPOSITE way (- 12 degrees) your steering castor angle is back to stock specs. there are some old threads on this if you search you will find them.
     
  12. micah

    micah 1/2 ton status

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    you could push the front axle forward a few inches, you could run a 1410 yoke on the axle (handles more angle than the stock 1310), or you could consider a doubler or some other type of compound case which will push back the front output on the 205.

    or you could do all 3 ;)
     
  13. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Ok,...now I understand.
     
  14. rubberlips

    rubberlips Newbie

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    Has anyone considered the use of a single joint on the transfer case end of the shaft as well as the single joint at the pinion yoke? It seems that the double cardan joint effectively shortens the the distance between the two mounting points thus increasing the angle. I've been wanting to do try this but I haven't found a local shop that will do it. I always here..."oh that'll make it worse". Why can we get away with this configuration on the rear shaft but not on the front.

    One of the driveshaft web sites has some excellent diagrams...I'll have to go and find it. Any thoughts on this?
     
  15. goldwing2000

    goldwing2000 Guest

    The double cardan joint may shorten the distance but it cuts the angle each joint sees in half. The benefit far outweighs the cost.
     
  16. d'cheat

    d'cheat Registered Member

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    The Double Cardan joint, "often called a CV joint" will not shorten your drive shaft causing more extreme angles. Your shaft still bends on the single u-joint nearest the transfer case like a non-cv shaft. The second u-joint mearely creates a second pivot point on the shaft to reduce the angle that the primary u-joint has to deal with. You can use two CV joints on a drive shaft, though you will have some additional vibration at road worthy speeds. Also, you are far more likely to break a double cardan on a rock. Joys of a low pinion.
     
  17. Big Truck

    Big Truck 1/2 ton status

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  18. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Very interesting. Thanks.
     
  19. koldsimer

    koldsimer 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    You've got a couple of options. The double c/v is possible and would certainly solve all of your problems if it is set up correctly. I think your best/cheapest/easiest route would be to just order up a superflex u-joint from tom woods. It has offset trunions that allow more distance between the yokes. I have a six inch lift on my blazer and the front angle was terrible. This was partially because of my longer shackle and moving the axle forward with the amount of droop that I have. Rather than shim my axle, I just ordered up that u-joint and haven't thought about it since. I can now put this kind of angle to my front driveshaft without worry...

    flex 014.jpg
     
  20. koldsimer

    koldsimer 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Like Perp said, call Jesse over at high angle driveline. He knows his stuff and he will not sell you something you don't need.
     

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