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Front dual shocks to single

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by kirkallen143, Apr 9, 2007.

  1. kirkallen143

    kirkallen143 Registered Member

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    This what I want to do on the burb, it sure is cheaper to buy two instead of four shocks, anyhow. Would you delete just one of the shocks (inner or outer)? The one I want to delete is the outer one, but it looks like it has a better lower mounting place at the front axle or does it make a difference how it mounts down there? The inner shock is mounted down next to the axle off to the side, via a long bolt. Thanks for any info.

    Kirk
     
  2. desertrat67

    desertrat67 Hawk Driver

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    My sub was setup up for duals, but my front axle wasn't( as far as I know) so I used the higher mount and the normal location on the axle for a single shock.
     
  3. kirkallen143

    kirkallen143 Registered Member

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    I appreciate the replys, I was searching (there are alot of topics on this) thru the forum and found kind of what I needed. I am going to leave the shock that is on the extended part of the bolt and just use a spacer inplace of where the angled shock was.
    From what I have learned, you can get rear shocks to fit the front for more travel, I ask because I plan on putting add-a-leafs in front to help those sagging leaf springs.
    Appreciate the help.

    Kirk
     
  4. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    One of the problems you may find using the outboard axle mounted shock position (especially in a single application) is that the bolt bends. On my setup, which doesn't have many miles, the rubber and metal shock bushing has slipped partially out of the shock because of the inherent slop in the quad shock mounting. The outboard mount is just flimsier. If you ask it to do ALL the work, I'd expect it to bend in pretty short order.

    On my setup, as much as I can flex it with a floor jack and jackstands (not as much as real-world, I know) I'm not even close to the *short* shocks travel limits.

    If you go with a single shock, you need to go with a shock DESIGNED for single use. The dual shocks are paired up, removing one leads to overworking the remaining one, since they are designed to be used together.

    Did you find that the lower shock mount (on the frame) is the "stock" location, and the quad shocks add the upper mount? Mine appears to be this way, the lower mount is riveted in place, and back when I added quad shocks, I bolted in the uppers.
     
  5. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    X2 Dont remove 1 shock. Pull them both and replace with shock designed for single apps.

    Personally I like my dual shock front in my K5. But i do a lot of desert driving. I have found single shocks get hot and fade on a long ride on washboard.
     
  6. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Have you tried a "good" single shock like the Bilsteins and what not? A little expensive just to try, but I am going to try a single shock and see what kind of ride I get. I'd like to get something that is soft enough to give as good a ride as possible (a joke in these trucks really) while still being able to cushion the suspension from the occassional pothole at higher speeds offroad.

    I personally would trade a bit of fade for a better ride, but then again, I'm not pushing the truck hard enough to worry about a decent shock fading from use either. :)
     
  7. kirkallen143

    kirkallen143 Registered Member

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    Oh yeah, I do plan on using a new shock that is made for a single application. Since this is just a huntin'/beer wagon/riding fences vehicle I just plan on using the cheaper shocks up front...what ever autozone has for $20 each.
    If I do plan on some extreme wheelin' down the road, if this rust bucket makes it that far without falling apart, then I will take the time and do it the right way.
    I have already been down the road with the 4-wheelin'/rockcrawlin' thing w/ a '73 ford bronco that I currently have. Like they say,"...do it right the first time or don't do it at all."

    Kirk
     
  8. kirkallen143

    kirkallen143 Registered Member

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    One more thing, if you don't mind, if I put add-a-leafs in front would I need longer shocks? No real flexing on this burb, could I use new rear shocks up front and be good enough for the extra lift? Heard that you can use the rears up front on a single application instead of using duals. I know someone here as done it, but I can't remember what lift they had, if any. Thanks.

    Kirk
     
  9. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I measured my front suspension (stock) the other day as best I can in the driveway, it looks like you'd need a large amount of lift before the shocks either bottom out or over extend. I will hit the bumpstops well before the springs are anywhere near full compression. Probably 3" to go.

    Travel may depend on the manufacturer of the shocks, I believe mine are some cheapy Monroe's. I'd do the springs first and see if shock changes are necessary. I could gain inches in lift before I'd have problems, and before I'd even bother checking.
     
  10. kirkallen143

    kirkallen143 Registered Member

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    The rear shocks I bought yesterday fully compressed are 14 1/2" to 15" eye to eye (where the bolt goes thru). The more vertical front shock as the burb sits now it @ 17" eye to eye.
    I think once the add-a-leafs are in it will be just fine at the front with a single shock application (that using shocks made for the rear).

    Kirk
     

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