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Front receiver fabrication "how-to"

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by dontoe, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. dontoe

    dontoe 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    [​IMG]


    I needed a through-bumper front receiver for a Multi-mount winch and for other uses including towing use. As I couldn't find an article on fabricating one and I wanted to keep the stock chrome bumper, as I like the looks, I had to start from scratch. So, here follows a simple-to-make and install, through bumper front receiver article.



    The components are:



    2- 2"X2"X3/16" tubing supports, 27” long, cut 45 degrees on the ends.

    2- 6"X1-1/2”X5/8" solid stock

    1- 12 inch receiver (Purchased as is or fab your own)

    4- 3-1/2"X half inch grade 8 bolts

    4- 1"X half inch grade 8 bolts

    8- 1/2 inch nuts

    8- 1/2 inch lock washers

    ½” drill bit

    Marker of some kind


    [​IMG]




    I purchased the 3/16" stock 2 inch square tubing from a local metal supply. It would be cheaper to buy used from a scrap yard though. (Realized that later on!)



    The 6”X1-1/2”X5/8” solid stock was from an old engine stand. Should be able to find some scrap or use a piece of 5/8” plate steel or stack thinner material to approximately 5/8”.



    The 12” receiver came from Tractor Supply but is easy to find or fabricate.



    Grade 8, ½” bolts, nuts and washers came from Lowes hardware.





    Assembly



    Drill a ½” hole in each end of the 5/8” stock pieces about 1-1/4” from the end. (Mine were pre-drilled from their previous use). Weld the 5/8” solid stock pieces onto the 12” receiver 2-1/4 inches from the back edge and 2-1/2” apart, centered side to side of course. The reason I used this thickness is; together with the two inch cross bars, it places the receiver close to the center of the tag mount area of the front bumper.



    Make 45 degree cuts on each end of the 2X2X3/16” tubing, making them 27 inches long at the longest points. (I cut 45 degree angles to facilitate installing/tightening the 1" bolts that hold the cross bars in the frame.) The frame members are about 28” apart inside to inside, this leaves a little room on each end for ease of installation/removal. Drill ½” holes in each end of the cross bars, about one inch from each end.



    Center the receiver assembly on the cross bars to mark the holes for the 3-1/2” X1/2” diameter bolts that hold the receiver assembly to the cross bars and drill the ½” holes.



    Place the cross bars in between the frame members and bolt the receiver assembly to them with the 3-1/2”X1/2” diameter bolts. Slide the assembled unit forward until it is almost touching the front bumper. Square it up in the frame. Mark the bottom of the frame where the cross bars are.



    Slide the receiver all the way forward to mark the backside of the front bumper where the hole needs to be cut out. Go around the end of the receiver with your marker. I used a silver Sharpie marker for that.



    Slide it back out of the way and drill small holes through the bumper, from the backside, at the four corners of the marked outline. Definitely take your time here.



    Take a grinder with a cutting disk, and from the front side of the bumper, cut the square hole in the front bumper (connected the dots previously drilled from the backside).



    Unbolt and remove the assembly and then bolt it back together on the ground so you can hold it up against the bottom of the frame to mark the cross bar mounting holes locations that need to be drilled in the frame members. Use the marks you did when it was in place between the frames. A little creativity here will help you get the markings for the ½” mounting holes correct. Drill the ½” holes in the frame members.



    Unbolt, place the cross bars back in the frame and bolt the receiver and cross bars back together but don’t tighten yet.









    The reason I didn’t just lay the parts in place, and weld it all together is because I wanted to be able to remove it if needed. And I bolted the 5/8 inch stock pieces to the cross bars instead of welding them in order to get it in and out of the frame members. Welded together in one piece, it would be almost, if not impossible, to install.






    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]






    Please remember the photos perspective may cause you to think the things aren’t square or equal distance. Just a trick of the camera.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2005
  2. jeeptuff

    jeeptuff 1/2 ton status

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    Nice write up, but the only thing I see wrong in the pictures is, dump the grade 5 hardware and jump up to grade 8.
     
  3. jeeptuff

    jeeptuff 1/2 ton status

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    The more I come back to this thread and look the more I think, if you are going to be pullin via a winch, I would figure out a way to have more than 4 moounting point. The stress on it being mounted at just the lower portion just doesn't seem to be enough. Might just be me I have a tendency to overbuild..

    Like I say though nice write up..
     
  4. 85mudblazin

    85mudblazin 1/2 ton status

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    Set the crack pipe down. Those are Grade 8 :wink1:
     
  5. Muddytazz

    Muddytazz 1 ton status

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    Look at any winch on the market, they are only held onto the bumper via 4 bolts. So it will be plenty fine :thumb:


    Very nice write-up btw.
     
  6. CyberSniper

    CyberSniper 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    You'll want to make L-brackets out of angle or something that hook into the top part of the frame for when you do something besides a perfectly straight horizontal pull. My front receiver my Dad built is a bit overkill and requires you to assemble it between the frame rails. You'll probably end up with the same "feature".
     
  7. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage 1/2 ton status

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    looks good.

    Only thing I can't understand is why you bolted it together in case you ever wanted to take it out, but then you cut a hole in the bumper :confused:

    Other than that, looks good.

    Nice child labor in first photo. :wink1:
     
  8. mikey_d05

    mikey_d05 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Wait...Dontoe....you have a truck? I thought you just hung in the lounge for our entertainment :D

    Cool man, if I can rig up something on our Super Duty I'm definitely gonna try, it's handy to manuever trailers the other way.
     
  9. jeeptuff

    jeeptuff 1/2 ton status

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    Them look like grd5's to me.. Around these parts all the grd8 suff is black..


    and no crack pipe just bud light.. :wink1:
     
  10. mikey_d05

    mikey_d05 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Around here grade 8 stuff is yellowish/gold when bought new. The only black grade 8 pieces I've seen are OE bolts on vehicles.
     
  11. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage 1/2 ton status

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    I would think grade 5 would be better to use. More likely to just bend under heavy load then snap off as compared to grade 8, being that they are not as brittle.
     
  12. dogdaysunrise

    dogdaysunrise 1/2 ton status

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    grade 8 is stronger then grade 5. That looks sweet, get a license plate mount like on the old cameros so you can flip it down to throw on a winch or ball. Im so looking into doing this for my truck.
     
  13. gambit420s

    gambit420s 1/2 ton status

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    excellent write up, and a good idea, the finished product looks very good and functional, i made a rear hitch in similar manner

    how easy is the hitchpin to get at?

    i would just make a 2x2 tube with a plate on the end to mount the license plate on...

    i really thought you only knew how to find absurd and whacky things on the 'net, nice truck..

    not to hijack, but....

    Fasteners come in various finishes regardless of grade, the most common being plain, black oxide, blue zinc, yellow zinc, and hot dipped galvanized.

    Finish is simply a matter of corrosion protection, while yellow zinc is usually reserved for grade 8 fasteners, it is not a guarantee that it is grade 8 or that a lack of finish means it's of a lesser grade.

    I can and do purchase grade 8 in yellow zinc, blue zinc, plain, and hot dipped galvanized. Although galvanized is usualy a non-stock item, as the metal in grade 8 fastners is better and mildly more corrosion resistant than lesser grades, thus making galvanzation redundent in most applications.

    While most big box stores only sell yellow zinc grade 8, there are other sources....
    (shameless self-promotion) If anyone ever needs fasteners you can reach me at (865)388-2970.

    and will someone please hunt down the "but grade 5 bends" people and beat them with a very large bolt, i'll send you the bolt, free....

    bolts.JPG
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2005
  14. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage 1/2 ton status

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    What I'm saying is that grade 8 bolts are fully hardened. Grade 5 bolts are not. Being fully hardened, grade 8 bolts are more brittle. They will snap when too much force is exerted on them. Grade 5 bolts are more likely to just bend than to snap.

    This isn't something I'm just making up. :wink1:

    Same reason you don't use grade 8 bolts on an antennna tower. They are too brittle. You use grade 5.














    examples:

    http://www.boltdepot.com/fastener-information/Materials.aspx

    Grade 5
    Grade 5 bolts are case hardened. This means that the outside part of the bolt has been hardened but that the bolt was not heated enough to harden the inside portion. This creates a bolt that is fairly hard but not as brittle as a fully hardened bolt. Grade 5 bolts are the most common bolts found in automotive applications. Grade 5 bolts have 3 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.

    Grade 8
    Grade 8 bolts are fully hardened. This means the bolt has been hardened all the way through. This creates a bolt that is very hard but somewhat brittle. Grade 8 bolts are more likely to snap off than bend under extreme loads. Grade 8 bolts are often found in demanding applications such as automotive suspensions. Grade 8 bolts have 6 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.
     
  15. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Nice job!..

    That was a very informative write up!...and you did a good job fabbing your own!..I'm like you,I'll spend a whole day welding scrap together into something useful,rather than buy anything.. :p:

    But for those of us who dont have welders,steel,or time,I think the factory built one from Northern Tool for 129.95 is a good buy.. :thinking: :whistle: :crazy:
     
  16. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Sorry, but you've fallen victim to the "Grade 5 is better" myth. Look at this page from the same site you linked.

    Bolt ratings

    As I've said countless times before, G8 may break with little warning where G5 often bends or deforms visibly before breaking, a G5 will have failed completely LONG before a G8 will break...

    Oh, and VERY nice on the receiver! :waytogo:
     
  17. dontoe

    dontoe 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I use a locking one when the winch is in, even with the key that you insert in the end, it's easy to install/remove! :cool:
     
  18. 3rdshiftdesign

    3rdshiftdesign 1/2 ton status

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    grade 5 is better than grade 8.... pfft.
     
  19. BranndonC

    BranndonC 3/4 ton status

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    ok, say you have a popsicle stick and a pencil, now press on the stick with your thumb, it will bent before it brakes, but when it does finally brake, the same force on the pencile will just laugh at you and say give me more, that’s the difference between grade 5 and 8, yes 5 bends, but it will bend or brake way before a grade 8 even flinches
     
  20. mudslinger99

    mudslinger99 1/2 ton status

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    Excellent write up :saweet:
     

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