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Fuel system problem

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Scott39, Aug 15, 2005.

  1. Scott39

    Scott39 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Lakewood, CO.
    I have a 91 k5, it has a fuel cell in the back in the bed, it has a vent tube hooked up to the tank, and everything else is hooked up, except the hose going to the evap canister.
    It cuts out alot when you use the throttle all the way to the floor, and vapor locks when it is real hot outside, and you can hear bubbling in the tank.
    The cooler the temp is outside, the better it runs, doesn`t matter if I have a full tank, or a half tank, or almost empty tank.
    Do I need to hook up the evap canister, and I do not know what kind of fuel pump that is mounted on the frame, I bought it this way?
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2005
  2. Scott39

    Scott39 1/2 ton status

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  3. randy88k5

    randy88k5 1/2 ton status

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    I would try replacing the pump first, since its easy to get to. It might be going bad, and showing symptoms when its hotter and resisrtance is greater. Not to sure about the bubbling. Is the tank sealed properly?

    I would hook up the evap to recover the fumes, but I dont believe this is the cause of your problem.

    Good luck.

    -Randy
     
  4. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Hi Scott! If your rig still has the TBI, then there should be two fuel lines. One that sends gas to the TBI and another that lets the excess fuel return to the fuel cell. This helps keep the fuel cool.
     

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