Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

full time 4 wheel drive question

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by weisel, Feb 27, 2001.

  1. weisel

    weisel 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2001
    Posts:
    491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Laveen, AZ
    I have a stock 77 k5, and I've read that I have full time 4 wheel drive. I am confused because my transfer case says L loc, L, N, H, H loc. What is the trancefer case doing when in these positions? I would think that L, and H, arn't 4 wheel drive positions, but how can that be full time 4 wheel drive.

    Insurred by Smith & Wesson
     
  2. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,816
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Guatemala, Central America
    The LOC positions are what any other truck refers to 4wd. Both driveshafts must turn at the same speed.

    In the Non-Loc positions, both driveshafts turn, but they are engaged by a differential that allows one driveshaft to turn faster than the other. This is what allows you to drive it on dry pavement without the driveshafts binding.

    Some people don't realize full-time 4wd is a very nice feature and install a part time kit trying to improve mileage. Just look at the new vehicles, many feature "all-wheel-drive" and stuff like that. In my opinion, full-time 4wd Blazer with a locker on the rear is an almost unstoppable beast.

    <font color=blue>//////
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://blazer79.coloradok5.com>http://blazer79.coloradok5.com</A>
    </font color=blue>[​IMG]
     
  3. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2000
    Posts:
    4,675
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Ohio
    Here's a quick explanation of the positions:

    H = high range, full-time 4wd position, this is the position to use for everyday driving on the road. The transfer case has a center differential (similar in design to the axles) which is open. This allows both the front and rear driveshafts to spin at different speeds to prevent binding when turning on pavement. This position can also leave you with only 1 tire spinning in certain situations (assuming the axles are also open). For example, if you jacked the left front tire off the ground only it would spin (power goes to the path of least resistance).

    L = low range, full-time 4wd position, same as above but engages the reduction of the transfer case for an additional 2:1 gearing. This will give you more pulling power as the gears will effectively be twice as low as when in high. Top speed is probably only 30-40 mph or so. This position is good if you were pulling a really heavy load up a steep paved road, such as farmers hauling heavy grain wagons on the road.

    N = neutral, same as putting the transmission in neutral.....

    H loc = this "locks" the center differential in the transfer cases, which means both the front and rear driveshafts are locked together. You only want to use this position on low traction surfaces (snow, mud, etc.) where extra traction is needed. If you try to turn on pavement, the front and rear driveshafts will try to bind and usually cause the truck to hop. This position works the same as 4wd hi (4 HI) in a part time transfer case (which would have 2 hi, 4 hi, 4 low.....).

    L loc = same as H loc, but engages the reduction of the transfer case (2:1). Used when maximum traction and power are needed, such as deep mud, snow, etc. This position works the same as 4wd low (4 lo) in a part time transfer case (which would have 2 hi, 4hi, 4 low....).
     
  4. weisel

    weisel 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2001
    Posts:
    491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Laveen, AZ
    Wow, thanks for all the info so quickly. But dose this mean that I should leave the hubs locked all the time?

    Insurred by Smith & Wesson
     
  5. Goose

    Goose 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,127
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    South Central Kansas
    Well, if you have lock out hubs, somebody may have converted the transfer case to part time.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Dragworm

    Dragworm Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Posts:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    What's the reliability of the hubs used for full time as opposed to the lock outs?

    So, which one of you is the brains of the operation?
    To tell you the truth it's not exactly a "brains" type operation.
     
  7. ksogn

    ksogn Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2001
    Posts:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    norway, oslo
    so if you have if you have it on loc, the car wil jump if you have difrent whels in the front than the back??? or?? and it vil work if you dont have it in the loc??

    sorry for my bad english!

    :)
     
  8. EDdaTREE

    EDdaTREE 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2000
    Posts:
    1,253
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austintown, OHIO
    Easiest way to find out if yours is a full or part-time case is to put it in a non-lock position on the shifter and unlock the hubs. If it is still full-time..the front driveshaft will spin and the truck goes nowhere...if the truck moves in a non-lock position with hubs unlocked it has a part-time kit in the t-case. The full-time hubs are said to be a lot stronger since they're basically a 2 inch thick flange locking the wheel to the axle...no moving parts to break. I run my 76' with lockouts and a full-time case to give a lot more driving choices.

    "I'm not stuck...I'm just being as ONE with nature"
     

Share This Page