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Fusible link amp ratings?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 77crewcab, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. 77crewcab

    77crewcab 1/2 ton status

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    Does anyone know what the amp ratings are for the fusible links in the ignition wires to the starter? I am looking to add circuit breakers but don't know what size to get.
     
  2. diaedy

    diaedy Registered Member

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    The one in mine is 20 amps
    86 350 cu in. 4 bbl
     
  3. 77crewcab

    77crewcab 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks I was actually thinking it was 25 or so. I'll go with a 20 then.
     
  4. 77crewcab

    77crewcab 1/2 ton status

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    Does any one know a part number for a resetable circuit breaker 20amp. Wnt to Autozone and the only one they could find was a non resetable fuse style which wasn't what I was looking for. Looking for something to mount to the firewall and where I can push a button to reset if tripped.
     
  5. 350k5

    350k5 1/2 ton status

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    I blew my fuseable link once before and I tired to replace it with a waterproof inline fuse. It seemed to be a good idea in that each time it blew the fuse I could just replace it. The only problem was that it would blow the fuse all the time, it never worked very well. I finally just replaced it with another fuseable link from the auto parts store for GM vehicles. I haven't had a problem with that, and I'm even running an amplifier and high power stero.

    Then again if that link was to blow again it would be a really pain to have to replace it again. If you do find something like that then let me know becasue that would be a good way to avoid getting stranded somewhere.
     
  6. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    What I did ....

    I remove the red wires with the fusible links from the solenoid,and attach them to the positive battery post or cable instead..that way they wont burn up in that "pipe" they go thru near the exhaust manifold(99% of the reason the fusible links fail in the first place!)...it also means only the positive battery cable and the purple wire to activate the solenoid is all the wires you'll have to deal with next time you drop the starter...you might have to extend the wires to reach the battery..use 8 gauge wire and solder any splices,tape everything good..Now if you pop a fusible link,they are right near the battery,and are easy to reach--no more crawling under the truck and working upside down on your back.. :laugh:

    Use conduit or "crinkle wrap" over the wires to protect them from chafing,and away from the exhaust or other heat sources.--I wire tied mine to the inner fender panel.....I'd leave the fusible links intact,curcuit breakers or fuses are a bad idea--I would not want ALL power to fail at 70 MPH on the freeway just because the circuit breaker popped from a bass note from a huge amp or a voltage surge or something!... :eek1: :crazy:
     
  7. 77crewcab

    77crewcab 1/2 ton status

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    That is what happened last time the links blews. 60mph construction zone at night in the rain going over an overpass and at the top I lost all power when one of the wires came loose from the starter and ground out on the frame. It was horrible to try and replace them and there has been a lot of talk here about using resetable circuit breakers for this purpose. I would love to just push the button to reset and be on my way. Plus I could mount them in an easy to service location. All I could find was the non resetable fuse types or the firewall mountable style that was 140 amp for RVs or something. I know Painless has some resetable fuse types but was looking for something to mount to the firewall in someway not just and inline fuse holder with a breaker in it.
     
  8. 77crewcab

    77crewcab 1/2 ton status

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    I did find some online that are basically 4 and 6 circuit fuse blocks that could mount to the firewall and then use the resetable fuse type breaker. I'll probably go with something like this as it seems the simplest way and would accomodate blade fuses, or circuit breakers should something happen to the breaker and I need a replacement I could use a regular fuse or non resetable breaker. Basically parts that could be found anywhere. The fuse blocks are also avail up to like 12 circuit so it could be an easy way to add accessories like lights etc.
     
  9. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Throwing this out for some education.

    I was under the impression that adding connections to a circuit (fuse holders, circuit breakers, etc) increases the resistance, which causes more problems.

    I've noticed that newer cars seem to exclusively use huge breakers though, or on some Honda's, flat steel "fuses" that are quite large.

    Is there a reason short of cost that breakers weren't or aren't used in some applications? Would the increased resistance on those wires from breakers be noticeable? I know that the voltage drop from the alternator to fuse panel is typically .5-1V in our type of vehicles, and that's approaching a 10% drop. It would suck to make that worse.

    From what I've seen of newer vehicles, as accessories grew in demand, so did the usage of breakers, but also much larger gauge wiring, which the trucks don't have.
     

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