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gas lines

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by KENNY, Sep 3, 2001.

  1. KENNY

    KENNY 1/2 ton status

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    I have had trouble with the gas lines previously and I am thinking of replacing them. A friend of mine suggested that I use copper flexible tubing. anyone know of pros and cons to using this material.
     
  2. BurbinOR

    BurbinOR 3/4 ton status

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    Not sure how 'authentic' the advice is but I was told to NOT use copper. I used NAPA 3/8" supply line when I did my fuel pump relocation/upgrade and turned out great. Pretty easy to bend with the right tools and this way you know you have the right stuff. Not worth messing with copper in my opinion.

    <font color=blue>'79 ONE TON TPI K5 - See it at---&gt;<a target="_blank" href=http://www.blazzinor.rockcrawler.com>www.blazzinor.rockcrawler.com</a>
     
  3. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    DO NOT USE COPPER! It work hardens (from flexing which happens alot in a 4x4), gets brittle, and cracks. Use either steel, stainless, or aluminum for fuel lines and steel or stainless for brake lines.

    '71 Blazer CST w/ a 400sbc, 4" lift, 36" Supper Swampers, and alot of rust
    <a target="_blank" href=http://community.webshots.com/user/triaged>See it Here </a>
     
  4. DesertDueler

    DesertDueler 1/2 ton status

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    I would recomend aluminum fuel line. It is thick and can be flexed quite a bit more that steel before it breaks. You can also bend it with your hands as long as you go slow.

    86 Jimmy 4"lift 35"MTRs Other cars 69Firebird w/525 hp,and 70GTO live in PHX,AZ<a target="_blank" href=http://www.geocities.com/modifierperformance>My vehicles</a>
     
  5. 1986Blazer

    1986Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    Advice here on this board is great! However, in this case listen to some additional advice....Do not hand bend the lines!!!!!!!!!!!

    Go to Sears or Napa to get the proper tube bending and cutting tools. There is no way you can bend them or cut them on your own withour screwing it up.

    Once you get the tools, get at least three extra fuel lines and practice. This type of repair is not easy. It took me six "practice" lines to learn how to do this. I replaced the fuel and tranny lines on my K5 and they are my own "design". The practice is worth the knowledge. Just practice the bending......it is harder than you may think.

    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.geocities.com/keywestk5/KeyWestK5.html>http://www.geocities.com/keywestk5/KeyWestK5.html</a>
    So I says to him, I said, "get your own monkey."
    1986 K5, 350 GM Crate, 700R4, NP208
     
  6. shane

    shane 1/2 ton status

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    Acually, all materials will eventually work harden. Copper and aluminium are about the same. This is not a problem you just have to ensure that the line is securely mounted and that any place where there is movement you allow for it with a flexible line. (such as rubber or braided stainless)

    Shane

    Never argue with idiots; They will drag you down to their level and beat you up with experience [​IMG]
     
  7. KENNY

    KENNY 1/2 ton status

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    thanks for your replies
     
  8. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Even aluminum I have seen in print to not use. Again the work hardening, as well, I believe the corrosion properties COULD be a factor. In any case, I was told not to use AL for oil cooling lines, and I did anyways. No problems, but they were a little difficult to get to seal, even with flare fittings OR compression fittings : )

    Dorian
    My tech/links page: <a target="_blank" href=http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html>http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html</a>
    No anti-theft measures on your truck? No pity when its stolen
     

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