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Get outside..............now!!!

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by dontoe, Nov 18, 2006.

  1. dontoe

    dontoe 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Saturday, 18. November 2006

    Strong Leonid Meteor Shower Expected Tonight

    If you live in Western Europe or eastern North America and if that night is clear, bundle up warmly and head outside because you may be able to catch a glimpse of an intense, albeit brief display of Leonid meteors.


    Leonid fireball on November 18, 1999The Leonids are composed of the dusty debris that has been shed by the comet Temple-Tuttle, a small celestial body that orbits the Sun at 33-year intervals. In those years during and then for several years after the comet has swept through the inner solar system, it has had a propensity for producing spectacular meteor displays; meteors falling by the hundreds, if not thousands per hour.
    These "shooting stars" all apparently emanate from the constellation of Leo, the Lion. Hence the name "Leonids."
     
  2. Stickseler

    Stickseler 3/4 ton status

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    We drug the kids out in the sticks a few years ago a zero drk thirty and saw those, It was way cool. And the Meteors were neat also
     
  3. mtnman210

    mtnman210 1/2 ton status

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    any idea what time we should go look out here on the west coast
     
  4. dontoe

    dontoe 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Where to see it
    Those regions of the Earth that are in prime position to see another potential Leonid outburst are western Africa and western and central Europe, where the constellation Leo will ride high in the southeast sky as the peak of the shower arrives. Morning twilight will begin shortly thereafter.
    In North America, for the Maritime Provinces of Canada, New England, eastern New York and Bermuda, the Sickle of Leo (from where the Leonids appear to emanate) will be above the east-northeast horizon just as the shower is due to reach its peak.
    But because Leo will be at a much lower altitude compared to Europe, meteor rates correspondingly may be much lower as well.
    However, this very special circumstance could lead to the appearance of a few long-trailed Earth-grazing meteors, due to meteoroids that skim along a path nearly parallel to Earth's surface.
    Seeing even just one of these meteors tracing a long, majestic path across the sky could make a chilly night under the stars worthwhile.
    Unfortunately, for the central and western United States and Canada, the Leonid outburst will likely have passed before Leo rises; at best, nothing more than the usual 10 or so Leonids per hour will likely be seen.
    Keep in mind that for New England and U.S. East Coast, the peak is due locally on the previous calendar day, Saturday, Nov. 18, at 11:45 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.
    For the Canadian Maritimes and Bermuda, the corresponding time is 12:45 a.m. on Sunday, the 19th. For Newfoundland it is also on the 19th, but at 1:15 a.m.
    Preparing for your meteor watch
    No two observers prepare for a meteor vigil the same way. It helps to have had a late-afternoon nap and a shower, and to wear all-fresh clothing.
    Be sure to keep this in mind: At this time of year, meteor watching can be a long, cold business. Expect the ambient air temperature to be far below what your local radio or TV weathercaster predicts.
    When you sit quite still, close to the rapidly cooling ground, you can become very chilled. You wait and you wait for meteors to appear.
    When they don't appear right away, and if you're cold and uncomfortable, you're not going to be looking for meteors for very long! Therefore, make sure you're warm and comfortable.
    Heavy blankets, sleeping bags, groundcloths, auto cushions and pillows are essential equipment. Warm cocoa or coffee can take the edge off the chill, as well as provide a slight stimulus.
    It's even better if you can observe with friends. That way, you can keep each other awake, as well as cover more sky. Give your eyes time to dark-adapt before starting.
    Probably the best bet is to rest on a lawn lounge chair, all the way back, so you can look up and see the whole sky.
    When you see a streak, mentally run it backwards across the sky. Do the same with the second and third and note where their paths cross.
    Right there will be the Sickle of Leo (with the bright planet Saturn also shining in that same general vicinity), and that's where the Leonid radiant will be.
     
  5. mtnman210

    mtnman210 1/2 ton status

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    cool thanks it looks like I'll be waking my butt up at ass-crack of dawn to go check it out.


    can anybody say NIGHT RUN!
     
  6. 4xcrazy

    4xcrazy 3/4 ton status

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    I have actually been seeing alot of these in the past few weeks already, i head to Flagstaff everyday around 4:30 ish in the morning, heck on Thursday i saw 4 shoot across the sky within an hour, was pretty cool, odd, but cool
     

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