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getting a new house with a garage, what lights?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by dogdaysunrise, Sep 7, 2005.

  1. dogdaysunrise

    dogdaysunrise 1/2 ton status

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    Im moving into a new house (new to me anyways) this fall and am going to be re wiring the garage. So far the plans are to wire in a 60 amp sub panel to run the outlets, and im going to bring up a 220v line from the main panel to run the welder. Im going to use the exsiting power to the garage to run the lights a space heater and the garage door opener.. but that brings me to the lights, the lighting sucks ass in that garage. Do you guys prefer flourecant (sp?) or incandesant lights in your garage? It gets real friggin cold up here in the winter and the insulation isnt great in there. I like flourecent better then incandecant, but amjust curious if the cold would be real bad for them?

    Suggestions?

    Thanks,

    Mike
     
  2. sweetk30

    sweetk30 professional hooker Premium Member

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    standerd floresent no good in cold. but i love them for light 8 footers. even spaced on celing and some close to floor for side light.
     
  3. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage 1/2 ton status

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    get 8 foot fluorescents. AT LEAST H.O. type. I think they are supposed to be able to come on at down to -20 . If you got the cash, VHO is even better, but they are high. The 8 foot HO fixtures run around $50, not sure on the VHO.


    HO will probaly be all you need though. If it is super, super cold, they may be a little dim at start up, but they will warm up and brighten up.
     
  4. Indyblazer

    Indyblazer Registered Member

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    Special Fluorescent Lights

    They make special fluorescent light fixtures that are designed to light up at zero degrees temperature. The boxes are marked. They cost a little extra, but if it is cold and you want fluroscent lights... these work! I put in fluorescent lights because they use a lot less electricty for the same amount of light. About 25% as much as incandescent bulbs. With high energy prices they pay for the extra cost and you start saving you money very quickly. I have seen these fixtures at Home Depot and suspect other major building material stores would have them.
     
  5. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage 1/2 ton status

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    yes, they are called HO's or VHO's ...that's why I suggested them ;)
     
  6. gauder

    gauder Banned

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    Sometimes mine flicker for a minute or 2 in the cold winter. I wouldn't trade them for incandescent though.
     
  7. u2slow

    u2slow 1/2 ton status

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    I got bunch of 347V 4-lamp fixtures from a commercial reno job.... for free :p:

    Then I bought some 0* 120V electronic ballasts. They run four 4' T8 lamps and were only $25 CDN each.

    You will spend a pretty penny on HO/VHO fixtures and their lamps... that's the reason most commercial installations use the 4' T8 based fixtures. T8s are also only 32W and deliver as much light as the 40W T12.
     
  8. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    As the others have stated, Low temperature Flourescents are the way to go. Incandescent, might as well call it a shadow maker.
     
  9. u2slow

    u2slow 1/2 ton status

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    Use caution with the heat... should really have a dedicated circuit. Doesn't take much to overload a circuit you are sharing with lights or garage door openers.

    You could get one of those 4800W box heaters for ~$60 and use it on your welding circuit (when you're not welding).
     
  10. 3 on the tree

    3 on the tree 1/2 ton status

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    Whatever lighting you end up with, it won't be enough or in the right place. Get yourself one of those twin head 1000w halogen light sets on the adjustable stand. Then you will have lighting wherever you need it. BTW, they also make good handwarmers in the winter.
     

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