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Good Respirator to Use?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Bross82, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. Bross82

    Bross82 1/2 ton status

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    I am in the process of replacing the front inner wheel wells and bought a rubberized undercoating spray to put on them. Is a normal respirator (with the filters on the sides, not the crappy 2 dollar mask) from the paint store good enough to filter anything from this spray?
    I also plan on doing a new paint job myself soon...will I need different filters for the mask when i do the paint job?

    Thanks
     
  2. BurbLover

    BurbLover 1/2 ton status

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    This brings up several issues. First, in order for any respirator to work, it must be properly fitted to your face and the tested to ensure it is doing what it should. Second, no one respirator cartidge is good for everything. The cheap dust filter is good for pretty much nothing. Keeps out the big stuff, but it's the small dust that's the problem anyway & that's what gets through. As for filters, they are manufacturer specific according to your respirator. Filters for the painting would be organic vapor cartridges. May also be refered to as N95/N99/N100. For sanding operations, a particulate or dust/mist filter may be necessary. May also be referred to as a P95/P99/P100. As to whether 95/99/100, this would depend on the actual suspect contaminants that you are concerned about. Basically, what chemicals are it the material to be sprayed and or sanded.

    Hope this helps, but doesn't scare.
     
  3. Roz

    Roz 1/2 ton status

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    i personally like the 3m one, its comfortable to my face structure and it (well most brands can also) has stackable filters. so u can filter particles out and them fumes. this has some good info. also OSHA web site has good info on ure filter maintenance and requirements. http://www.cdc.gov/nasd/docs/d000101-d000200/d000111/d000111.html it will filter particulate and fumes.
     
  4. Scrubby

    Scrubby 1/2 ton status

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    I think for the undercoating you should be ok with the 3m style respirators, but if you are going to paint the truck that might be a different story.

    From what I have read all epoxy primers or urethane paints contain isocyinates. The 3m style respirators are not rated to protect you from those. Only a supplied air unit like a hobby air can do that. Yes, there are a lot of people painting with just 3m respirators, but I have read lots of horror stories about people with iso sensitivites. It is really up to you to make the decision.

    I currently have some single stage urethane waiting to be sprayed. I was going to just shoot it with a 3m respirator, but a friend pointed me to some horror stories on the web. Now I am thinking I should order up a hobby air. I guess in the end, is the $400 for a hobby air worth your future health.
     
  5. shelbyfordgt

    shelbyfordgt Banned

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    +1

    isocyinates is labeled on the paint can. If you cant afford an outside air mask, i suggest finding a paint without isocyinate.
     
  6. BurbLover

    BurbLover 1/2 ton status

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    FYI, the biggest issue with the Isocyanates is during the curing process of the paints. Not to say it's no big deal, but it actually off-gases during the curing more than it becomes airborne during the application. If you use this type of paint, I recommend dooing it in a well ventilated area and make sure it is fully aired out prior to entering after curing. See container to estimate cure time.
     
  7. MikeS

    MikeS Registered Member

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    I bought a HobbyAir system a few years back. One of the best $400 investments I ever made. There has been some controversy out there about the effects of isocyanates but I wasn't taking any chances. $400 didn't seem like too much to protect my health. I was a whole lot more comfortable spraying without having to wonder about what I was doing to my lungs.

    Mike
     
  8. shelbyfordgt

    shelbyfordgt Banned

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  9. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    I got the 3m one, which takes care of the organic vapors. Not sure as to exactly if they would take care of the iso-whatevers.
     
  10. bigjbear

    bigjbear 1 ton status Staff Member Moderator

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    Either North or 3M make good ones. Use an organic vapor cartridge. If you think anything will drip on it while painting or if there are a lot of solids in the air where you are working snap HEPA filters over the organic vapor cartridges.
     
  11. Bross82

    Bross82 1/2 ton status

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    ok, cool thanks...i dont remember specifically what was in the rubbersized coating. i would have to look when i get home

    one other thing, i forgot to specify, when i would do the whole paint job i was thinking of getting a spray gun attachment for my compressor. are the isocyinates typically found mostly in the rattle cans or in the paint i'd use in the spray gun? or both? Thanks.
     
  12. shelbyfordgt

    shelbyfordgt Banned

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    it's mostly found in professional paints.
     
  13. Bross82

    Bross82 1/2 ton status

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    ok

    then for something in a rattle can like Krylon Rust Tough Enamel (Contains Ketones, Toluene and Xylene) I should be all set with an organic filter?

    and for the Loctite Rubberized Undercoating (Contains methyl alcohol, butane, propane, and asphalt) I would be all set with the organic still??

    thanks
     

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