Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

good starter motorcycle? pics added

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by spongeidys, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. spongeidys

    spongeidys 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Posts:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dillion, CO and Palmerton, PA
    both ends of the spectrum...a good starter harley or a good starter sport bike...give me your opnions ;D
     
  2. justhorsinaround

    justhorsinaround 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Posts:
    6,798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northerish Phoenix, Az
    Go for the bicycle that has one of those engines that thunks down on the front tire.:D


    :haha:
     
  3. nc87k5

    nc87k5 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Posts:
    5,231
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina
    how big are you? height and weight if you want to give it.
     
  4. spongeidys

    spongeidys 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Posts:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dillion, CO and Palmerton, PA
    6'2 250 ive ridden dirt bikes altho not extensivly....but now i wanna get a bike for the street....something that i can ride that will get alot better gas mileage than my truck...looking to spend around 5k for something...still not sure what path i wanna take tho
     
  5. nc87k5

    nc87k5 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Posts:
    5,231
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina
    ok, the smallest bike I would start with is an 1100, preferably along the lines of a Shadow. My bike is an 1100 but it has the frame like a Sportster and it cramps my legs when riding long distance.
     
  6. spongeidys

    spongeidys 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Posts:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dillion, CO and Palmerton, PA
    yeah...im thinking more along the lines of a harely...cause itll keep me more in check...and i know if i get something that goes really super fast and handles well im gonna do something stupid......eventually
     
  7. nc87k5

    nc87k5 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Posts:
    5,231
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina
    well, you can check out the 1200 Sportster, but I think it'll still be too small a frame, I'm not really sure since I've never been on one. Just starting out with no passengers, I would go with the Dyna Super Glide or the Street Bob. Both are within the 12-14,000 range and are sporty looking. If you want to ride someone all the time, then a Heritage Classic or Road King would be the ticket, but they are in the 17,000 + range.
     
  8. Jagged

    Jagged 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Posts:
    11,460
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    SWVA
    Harleys can go 100+ easily as well.
     
  9. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2004
    Posts:
    10,877
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sacramento ca
    the VTX 1300 from honda is a damn good bike

    i think you get more out of a metric cruiser for less money
     
  10. nc87k5

    nc87k5 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Posts:
    5,231
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina
    yes they are, for around 9600, it's a nice cruiser.
     
  11. bowtiepower00

    bowtiepower00 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 11, 2000
    Posts:
    924
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    AZ
    I would look used. You're a pretty big guy, I'd avoid a sporty. Any HD Big Twin would suffice, and you can make them scream with a few mods. Metric bikes are significantly cheaper, but then you're riding a metric bike. If that doesn't bother you, then I would not buy a HD.

    I would avoid a bagger with tour paks, etc., from any manufacturer if you're just beginning to ride on the street, they are pretty top heavy and more difficult to manuver if you're not used to them.

    I would look at a HD Super Glide, FXR, or Softail family if you like Harleys. $8500-10K will buy you a nice one. If you're planning on laying the miles on, might want to look at a Road King.

    If you don't like HD's, then there are lots of other choices out there. I guess it depends on what you're planning on doing. A properly built HD will hang with most "sport bikes" on the road. You're not going to smoke a Busa, but I've whooped plenty of crotch rocket ass riding dinosaur technology pushrod engine HD's. The look on their face when you holeshot them is worth it all by itself.
     
  12. paulmoon

    paulmoon 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Posts:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Yep, a lot depends on how much $$ you want to lay down. Metric=less. HD=more. Me, metrics. Goldwing and VTX1300. HD are great bikes, just didn't want to lay out that much for a bike with more miles or smaller cc's. I love my VTX. Good power, comfortable, good mileage etc etc. For your weight, you might want to change the seat I think. Mine is a 2004 I bought this last Nov for $5900.00. Very clean and streight. Wind shield and saddle bags are very nice. This is an easy bike to ride. dependable. The big Kawi's and yamahas are nice too. Or so I've heard. IMHO, with your size, Any bike >1000cc might keep you from having to upgrade too quickly. I think with your prior experience with the machanics of riding a bike you could start with a larger street bike. paul
     
  13. bowtiepower00

    bowtiepower00 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 11, 2000
    Posts:
    924
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    AZ
    Not sure how extensive your riding background is, but you'll probably pick things up quickly. I've seen a lot of people pick up a "starter" bike, only to decide they want more bike after a few months or one riding season.

    It also depends on how often you ride, or plan to ride. If it's going to be a weekend hobby when the weather is nice, then I wouldn't spend a bunch of money on a bike. If you ride rain or shine, as a primary mode of transportation, then get all of the bike you want/ can afford.

    I agree that for a lot of riders, a metric bike is a better choice. They are generally more reliable, etc. Basically just add fuel and go, and change oil/ tires/ brake pads. That being said, a WELL AND PROPERLY MAINTAINED HD will be just as reliable and run just as well, but they will require more maintenance in most instances. The newer HD's (anything made from the mid 90's on, IMO) are lightyears ahead of the earlier models.

    Frankly, on the HD side, there are a lot of hack mechanics and shops- and that is going to be the difference between an enjoyable ownership experience and a horrible one. I really don't appriciate the whole HD factory mentality- inferior performance parts and poor service with an attitude. I stick with the independent shops. I'm not really familiar with the metric side of things, but I would make finding a good dealer/ shop your number one priority no matter what.
     
  14. broc944

    broc944 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Posts:
    1,660
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern Minnesota
    Get the bike you want. I know it sounds simple, but in the end that is what will make you happy.

    Riding is about being happy and free, wishing you had the other guys bike that goes past you in the other lane is not going to make you be so happy.

    I have had many different bikes. From one end of the spectrum to the other. The bikes I was most happy on carved corners and went fast. When I decided to get a new bike, thats what I went after.
     
  15. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

    Joined:
    May 8, 2001
    Posts:
    16,555
    Likes Received:
    157
    Location:
    Los Estados Unitos
    IMO, there isn't a spectrum for a starter bike. I think everyone should start on a standard-style bike or a cruiser, and move up from there. If you have the cash, take the course, too (unless you're lucky enough to be in a state where it's free). I've never heard of anyone regretting it, and they'll teach you the basics before you buy a bike, giving you a better idea of what to buy.
    When you're developing riding habits, it's very likely you're going to get tired of your first bike fairly soon after you really get comfortable riding. I've not yet known anyone (alive) that's really been into riding and only owned one bike, or not outgrown thier first bike in about a year. I would say NOT to drop a lot of cash on a first bike, unless you only plan to ride weekends, etc. You said you wanted a commuter, though, so I figure you're going to be spending some time in the saddle.

    It really comes down to the individual. I started with a Kawa Vulcan 750 cruiser, my brother started with a Suzuki GS 450. Now he rides a Vulcan 900 cruiser, and I ride a Kawa Concours (1000cc), Sport-tourer.
    Personally, if I could do it over, I would do it exactly the same. Learning on the 750 was pleasant, and once I "mastered" it, I moved up. It was light, I could recover quickly and easily from n00b screwups, I kept focus on bike control and riding conditions instead of self-control (as in keeping it near the speed limit), and when I dropped it on my leg, it didn't break it; the bike or my leg.
    Now on the Connie, I have moments on the expressway where I have to pull it back, and there's an occasional "Oh S%&$ I think I wheelie'd" when I have to speed up and merge. I wouldn't trade the Connie for a new Silverado (well, maybe), but I think learning on it would have been very stressful and I know I'd have developed some bad habits.

    A Ninja 500 is great to learn the basics on, they're sportbike-looking standards (not true sportbikes. You might be a little big for them, but sit on one at a dealer and see how it feels. You can find dozens in excellent shape with lo miles for under $2000, and I garauntee you will not feel as crappy if/when you drop that bike as opposed to dropping a Softail...

    Less CC's don't always mean less power, too. A Honda Magna 750 can blow the wheels off my old Vulcan 750. The Ninja 500 probably has about the same, maybe even slightly more power than my old 750 V-twin. Widely different engine designs, displacement isn't the power formula.

    Well anyway, I would recommend cutting your teeth on a used metric before getting a Harley, unless you do go with a Sportster. Buy a cheap bike, stick the rest of the cash in a 6-month Orange CD, then pull it out and buy a Heritage or something when you pass your road test and can always show full control over the starter bike.

    My dog is having a bad dream... She just yelped in her sleep...
     
  16. 1987Blazer

    1987Blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Posts:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Murrieta CA
  17. spongeidys

    spongeidys 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Posts:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dillion, CO and Palmerton, PA
    so uh...i kinda went all out....and baught a 07 1200 sportster roadster....i was looking at an 883 but then multiple people told me i would prolly want a bigger motor due to my size...so i went along with it and just walked out with a great deal...picking the bike up monday....they have to pull it out of the crate and put it together and make sure everything is ok with it....but i highly doubt ill be dissapointed
     
  18. 76zimmer

    76zimmer Flyin Rat Premium Member GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2005
    Posts:
    23,034
    Likes Received:
    1,349
    Location:
    Kzoo, Mi
    Dam, impulse buyer huh?
    I wouldn't have suggested a sportster at your size. But I guess you could put forward controls on it to stretch out some. I rode a 75 Iron head sportster for 18 years then got my Fatboy. I wished I had done it years earlier. It is a great long distance bike. Can't get outta that sportster deal huh?
     
  19. bowtiepower00

    bowtiepower00 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 11, 2000
    Posts:
    924
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    AZ
    I think you'll really enjoy the sporty. The newer rubber mount sporties are lightyears ahead of the earlier models. They ride like a smaller Superglide, and are easier to handle. I would consider Forward Controls a must, and their should be extentions available to give you another 2-3" of legroom over stock.

    The 883 doesn't have enough power to get out of it's own way. The 1200 is much better. I would suggest doing a "stage I" to your bike, which includes a higher flow exhaust and airbox, along with rejetting/ reprogramming. The power and drivability are greatly improved, as well as mileage.

    If you decide to keep the sporty, but want more grunt, I would do a Camshaft upgrade and performance ignition (stage II). Ported heads and 10:1 pistons would be a stage III, and would put your bike in the 80-100 HP range, enough to keep up with just about anybody light to light.

    Congrats on the new bike. Now go put some miles on!
     
  20. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

    Joined:
    May 8, 2001
    Posts:
    16,555
    Likes Received:
    157
    Location:
    Los Estados Unitos
    You'll be fine, I hear there are great Harley-owner support groups everywhere... :haha: :haha: just kidding...

    Since you bought new, make *sure* you negotiate your first service as part of the purchase or the dealer will probably drag you over the coals, although it may be too late if your name is in ink already. I've heard of a first service costing up to a grand. My brother's was $500 on his brand new Kawa.
    The first service is when a "factory trained" tech goes over the bike after xxx miles and makes sure all the bolts are still tight, etc. It's not something that should be skipped or done in the driveway, so negotiating how much it will cost you is important. For all I know, though, it may be complimentary on a new Harley. IMO, it should be complimentary on all new bikes, but it's not. Kinda BS, they force you to pay them to make sure their product isn't falling apart...

    Your bike is fuel injected, so you probably can't mess with the power without reprogramming it. It'll probably have enough power already anyway, and you said you didn't want to go crazy. It will probably get excellent mileage, too.
    Also, be careful with the electrical loading. I don't know if '07's are improved, but HD electrical systems are notoriously weak. If you get heated gloves, get HD gloves or specify that you ride an HD when buying them because they're literally designed different to avoid overloading it. IE, If you accidentally buy a normal set of Gerbings, you can send them to the factory and they'll rewire them for an HD.
    And don't slack on the maintenance!

    Have fun, and ride safe! :waytogo: :waytogo:
     

Share This Page