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Grooving Tires

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by Ryan Melton, Aug 17, 2001.

  1. Ryan Melton

    Ryan Melton Registered Member

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    Stephen,

    What kind of tool did you use to groove your tires? I am getting some tires I am going to groove and need to get something that will work for this. Will one of the hot iron manual groovers work? I have more time than money, but want something that will perform well. Also, do you sell any of these tools?

    Thanks,

    Ryan
     
  2. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    We went together with a couple of other local guys and bought a really nice grooving iron. It was about $300, which isn't too bad considering I could do my 42's in about 15 minutes per tire, without being in a hurry! The cheaper irons (which I've also used) are way slower than that, but can do a pretty decent job. You may also have a lesser selection of blade widths with the cheaper irons.
    I might be able to get another one of these irons if you want. We've found it works well to team up since it's a tool that you only need to use for a couple hours every year or so!

    Incidentally, we've also been using it to cut our street tires once they get down to the wear bars, it makes them act almost like new.

    Making the world better, one truck at a time.
    SW-ORD
     
  3. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Any suggestion for where to find the less expensive grooving irons? I'm looking at taking the wear bars out on my TSL's and maybe do some siping on them. They are obviously worn down so they make a good candidate for experimenting a bit.

    Rene

    <font color=green>Dyslexics of the world...UNTIE!</font color=green>
     
  4. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    Check out circle track racing magazines, they have a lot of different versions and are usually $80 or less. Maybe summit racing or jegs too?

    Making the world better, one truck at a time.
    SW-ORD
     
  5. dawson444

    dawson444 1/2 ton status

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    This may be a stupid question, but what are wear bars? Also any good pics of grooved tires? Thanks!

    Dawson
    Raleigh, NC

    88 K5, 6" lift, 36" TSL Radials, 14 Bolt, Rancho 9012s
     
  6. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Some people call them the 'tread wear indicators' its just a slightly raised part of the tire casing betwen the lugs of the tread.

    BTW, thanks Stephen, $80 is prolly in my price range...[​IMG]

    Rene

    <font color=green>Dyslexics of the world...UNTIE!</font color=green>
     
  7. rich

    rich 1/2 ton status

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    I have one of the cheaper irons that I bought for grooving snow tires for use in my demolition derbies. It was about $70. Got it from AFCO Racing - http://www.afcoracing.com They may refer you to a local dealer near you - I bought from them direct but they said to use my local dealer from now on.

    Works well, especially for the price. Just gotta be sure to plug it in and let it heat up fully before using it - it does not cut well when not heated. There are a selection of different blade shapes. You can ask AFCO about that.

    Hope this helps!

    Richard
    Raleigh, NC
    '90 K-5 Blazer - stock, daily driver
    '76 K-5 Blazer - 14-bolt FF, 4.10's, locked front and rear, 36's, SM465/NP205
     
  8. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Here's a direct link to their tire grooving tool: <a target="_blank" href=http://www.afcoracing.com/products/getproduct.cfm?CategoryID=1&amp;ClassID=11&amp;SubclassID=39&amp;ProductID=3618>www.afcoracing.com/products/getproduct.cfm?CategoryID=1&amp;ClassID=11&amp;SubclassID=39&amp;ProductID=3618</a>

    <font color=black>HarryH3 - '75 K5</font color=black>
    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.angelfire.com/super/ThunderTruck>www.angelfire.com/super/ThunderTruck</a>
    It's a great day to be alive...
     
  9. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Thanks! I just bookmarked it...

    Rene

    <font color=green>Dyslexics of the world...UNTIE!</font color=green>
     
  10. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Not to say this is rocket science or anything, but what made you choose to groove your tires in the manner you did? I don't really want to spend $1000 on a set of tires to make them useless, so how do you decide what helps and what doesn't?

    My friends have done minor mods to tires and one grooved out a set of TSLs that were bald, but what can you do to a good set of tires?

    Tim
    '84 Chevy K10, lifted, loud, fast, and 3/4 ton axles
     
  11. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Siping a new tire with the grooving iron is a good way to improve wet weather performance for one. For two the extra ridges and edges increase traction on any surface. Look at how an AT has very many little sipes in the tire...

    If i had Boggers I would sipe across the big lugs to increase lateral traction for example.

    My TSL's are prety bald now so i'm just looking to get some legal tread depth and do a little experimenting with some siping.

    Rene

    <font color=green>Dyslexics of the world...UNTIE!</font color=green>
     
  12. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    My goals were to break up the big tread blocks so they would flex a little better, and get more biting edges in a variety of different directions, so cutting the big blocks in 3rds seemed to be a good idea. I wanted more lateral hold, and more forward bite, which the different angles will give.
    I've seen several TSL's with the big blocks cut in half, and one set really similar to mine, and they seemed to work well in the real world.
    A lot of dirt track racers get almost religious about cutting the tires for different tracks and conditions, and the same principles apply to us, biting edges in the direction we want to grab.

    I've also siped a set of TSL's and had really good luck with that. I ran a cut (no material removed) about every 1/4" down the center tread and it made a noticible difference in snow and ice, and slick rock terrain. Just make sure you leave about 1/2" of solid rubber around a biting edge, the smaller 1/4" chuncks on mine tended to tear off in nasty rock.

    Making the world better, one truck at a time.
    SW-ORD
    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.offroaddesign.com>www.offroaddesign.com</a>
     
  13. scrapmetal

    scrapmetal 1/2 ton status

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    For what its worth, in this months subscription of Four Wheeler, they had a neat idea on how to groove tires with a hack saw blade, wood and a welder, havent tried it yet, but its sounds like it might work, I think I'll try it this weekend, if you see a big black cloud in the sky over Idaho, it didnt work,,ha ha,,

    Never been stuck, just temporarily delayed.
    <a target="_blank" href=http://hometown.aol.com/bcscrapper/myhomepage/index.html>hometown.aol.com/bcscrapper/myhomepage/index.html</a>
     
  14. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Cool Steve!

    My friend cut sections into his Gumbo Monster Mudders until they looked like TSLs and they worked very well!

    I guess it's pretty much hit and miss, and just for your application.

    Siping sounds like a good idea though for the snow. My BFG M/Ts could definitely benefit from that.

    Tim
    '84 Chevy K10, lifted, loud, fast, and 3/4 ton axles
     

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