Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Help! 6,2 won`t start after swap!

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by BelAir, Feb 4, 2003.

  1. BelAir

    BelAir Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2002
    Posts:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NORWAY
    Just finished putting my 1983 6.2 into my 1959 Chevy Biscayne this weekend, and was exited to try to start it.
    I had a new, dry, box dieselfilter in (mounted on back of intake), so I took the glowplugs out, loosened the injector lines at the injectors, all eight, and cranked until some diesel came out of all lines. Then reconnected the lines, screwed the glowplugs back in. Glowed the engine manually,
    all new G-60 plugs, and then cranked the engine with two 105 amp batterys. No start. The engine ran smooth as butter before we took it out of the donor van. I am getting power to the fuel cut off solenoid, and also to cold advance timing and the cold idleplunger-solenoid. So with glow in order, cranks wery fast, power to solenoids, I figure there must be an air lock, or that my new dieselfilter has not filled up and aired out properly. So I have spent some time cranking the car with the glowplugs out to try to vent the air out. No go, not even dieselvapour out of the glow-holes, as the Hayesmanual tells me to look for. Cant seem to find any bleed screw in the filter area, with the behind-intake mount, the diesel lines are hidden under the intake, and any bleeder valve is not to be seen. Diesel comes out of the lines at the injectors when I loosen them, but there doesent seem to be engough preasure to push the diesel through the injectors. There is diesel in the return lines(hoses) on the injectors. Any good tips?
     
  2. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,169
    Likes Received:
    1,366
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    I just went through this. I run a Racor water separator and an spin on filter instead of the box filter though. I found it took a fair bit of cranking to get diesel vapor through the GP holes. I would crack the lines and crank it in 15 second bursts (with a 1 minute cool down or more) and then tighten the lines up. Then I'd have a helper watch for vapor coming out. When i had 6 holes with vapor I re-installed all the GP's and made my first attempt to start it. It did fire up reluctantly and then mellowed out.

    It took a lot more than just waiting for fuel to dribble out of the cracked injector lines for the air to purge enough to get the injectors functioning...for me anyways.

    I'd say to do the injector thing again and see if any vapor comes out of any of the GP holes. No vapor, no start...

    rene
     
  3. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2002
    Posts:
    722
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Granby, MIssouri, USA
    Did you say you have two 105 amp batteries? That can't be right. I have two 950 cca (cold cranking amps) batteries on my truck, and it needs every bit of those amps to start well on a cold wintry morning.

    Unfortunately, there is no air bleed valve on the round, spin-on filter that mounts to the back of the intake manifold. GM did away with that filter in '84, and used a new style filter base on the firewall that did have a bleed valve. As far as I know, the only way to bleed your system is to do as you're doing.

    On edit: just realized that you don't have the spin-on filter, but the smaller square version used on vans....again, I don't think they have a bleed valve built in, but I'm not 100% sure on that one. My dad had an '83 van with the square filter, but I don't recall any air bleed valves like is used on the model 80 firewall style.

    I would suggest that you disconnect the power from the injection pump and crank the engine with the GP's removed. This will pump fuel through the filter, and into the return lines. This will prevent fuel (and air in the system) from getting into the injection pump. After you've done this a while, then you can put the wire back onto the pump, and try to bleed it through the injection lines. As long as there is any amount of air in the injection lines, it will not run. That's because the air will compress and absorb the injection pulses instead of overcoming the pressure and popping the injectors. Eventually, the fuel will have to work the air out, but it will take a while.

    Casey
     
  4. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2002
    Posts:
    15,160
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    He has 2 105 AH that is Amp hour which is total amount of juice in it.
    You probably have 65AH or 75AH.
    His 2 105AH should be fine.
    plus he didn't say it's not cranking hard enough it's just not running, and since he doesn't have anything coming out the GP hole, he still has air in the system. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  5. BelAir

    BelAir Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2002
    Posts:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NORWAY
    Thank you for your answers. I will try the method recommended, cranking with no current to inj. pump, to push diesel through filter and into return lines. Then I`ll reattach the power, crack the lines, and crank til diesel pours out. Then tighten, and crank till diesel vapour comes out GP holes.

    Regards Joe
     
  6. BelAir

    BelAir Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2002
    Posts:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NORWAY
    The engine is running! Found the culprit yesterday! Traced it back to the rubber hose connecting the tank to the copper line running to the engine. The hose clamp was a bit loose, and it was sucking air . Tightened it and added another clamp. Engine starts right up. Amazed how an early 6.2 (1983)can run so fine... Funny how such a small thing can delay you 2 weeks!!
    Now, I traded myself to a 88 6.2 diesel from a suburban. It had gotten preasure into the water, it had blown a radiator! But the owner drove it to the shop who took it out and replaced it. What do you think, could I be so lucky and get away with a head gasket change, or do you suspect engine/head cracking? Traded it for at General Motors/Fridgidair 1950s refridgerator....
     
  7. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2002
    Posts:
    722
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Granby, MIssouri, USA
    Congrats! Glad to hear you got it running. We would love to see some pictures of this vehicle if you get the chance.

    I would guess that 90 percent of the time, blown head gaskets are the cause of pressure in the coolant system. Cracked blocks typically allow coolant to get into the oil. A severely cracked head may allow pressure into the system, though. You won't know until you tear into it!

    Casey
     
  8. BelAir

    BelAir Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2002
    Posts:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NORWAY
    Thank you. Will probably finish putting on the front (inner wheel wells, hood, bumper this weekend. Should get some pictures posted withing a couple of weeks, as long as I find out how. A dieselmechanic fried of mine stated "this will be the first and the last 59 Chevy with a diesel engine" /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif But I don`t think so, I hope I am starting at trend... Fuelprices are rising now that Bush is rattling his sable, even the colorcoded taxfree fuel is more expencive. Add that Norwegian rules for cars more than 30 years are very good, no yearly road tax $330, no registration fee when you sell or buy one $300 to 3000! No yearly EEC-enforced technical test, cheap insurance $70.
    Cheap parts and if you look after it, the car should not fall in value.

    regards Joe
     
  9. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2002
    Posts:
    722
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Granby, MIssouri, USA
    Well, I don't know about a '59 Chevy, but how about a '58 Cadillac?

    http://www.thedieselpage.com/readers/krantz.htm


    Or a '77 Corvette?

    http://www.thedieselpage.com/readers/vet.htm


    Or how about a Toyota or Jeep?

    http://www.thedieselpage.com/readers/mcewan.htm

    http://www.thedieselpage.com/readers/fleming.htm


    I also know of a '51 GMC with a 6.5LTD stuffed into it. I don't have any pics of it online, though.

    The GM diesels are a wonderful choice for re-powering other vehicles.

    For more DP reader's rigs, check here:

    http://www.thedieselpage.com/readers/readers.htm


    Casey
     

Share This Page