Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Help going to Alaska

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by lakotajoe, Apr 3, 2002.

  1. lakotajoe

    lakotajoe Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Posts:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does anyone live in or around Anchorage who has around an 88 blazer or jimmy Im getting ready to move there and Ive heard they have pretty strict emisions laws I want to take my 88 jimmy but dont know if it will pass and was wondering if they have different catigories of tests or what I might need to do to get it to pass. Any help would be greatly appriciated
    Thank You
     
  2. OldBlew

    OldBlew Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2002
    Posts:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Girdwood, Alaska
    The emissions rules really suck.
    2 years ago I ran my '91 suburban 350 through the test.
    Visual on the:
    Air injection system (if applicaple)
    PCV
    Cat Converter
    Vacuum hoses & wiring
    02 sensor
    Carb/EFI system
    Intake heater
    EGR
    Early Fuel Evaporation (if applicaple)
    Other emssions related components
    Fuel evaporative controls
    manifold & ignition
    Emission control maintenance light

    Tailpipe inspection limits:
    HC:
    Idle: 750
    2500rpm: 750

    CO:
    Idle: 1.00
    2500rpm: 1.00

    C02:
    02:
    I don't have this information.

    The I/M tests are done privately, and a lot of them really know what they are doing.
    Make your engine compartment look as stock as possible.
    If you have an aftermarket manifold, paint it black.
    I'm not sure on how strict they are with headers.

    You may want to get a test done before you leave so there aren't any suprises. They also may be rough on you since you are from "outside".

    I am driving the Alcan next month, if you want I can give you a report.
     
  3. lakotajoe

    lakotajoe Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Posts:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes I would like to know how the trip goes Ive got a month or 2 till I leave but all info would be great.
    Thank you
     
  4. OldBlew

    OldBlew Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2002
    Posts:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Girdwood, Alaska
    I wrote my post still thinking it was March. I am leaving on the 20th of this month.
    Make sure you get the Milepost.
    www.themilepost.com
    It is the bible of the whole highway, and can be a real life saver.
    I don't mean to assume, but by your user name I am guessing that you are coming from S. Dakota or somewhere nearby.
    Let me know, just curious.
    I am leaving from the Seattle area. I live in Girdwood, a small town that is about 40 miles South of Anchorage.
    Just make sure you get the Milepost. It is worth its weight in gold, and will tell you about some of the accomodations and restaurants along the way.
     
  5. OldBlew

    OldBlew Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2002
    Posts:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Girdwood, Alaska
    Alaska Highway Report

    Here is the Alcan Report that LakotaJoe wanted.
    We took a week to get to Anchorage from Seattle. It can be done in 3 to 4 days, but we were having loads of fun.
    The highway was in great condition. There was only about 30 miles of gravel in the construction areas, but is was very well maintained. Most of the time we were going about 60mph over them.
    Gas prices absolutely suck. Fuel up before you cross the boarder.
    Gas prices ran as high as .889 per litre Canadian. There are just over 4 litres per U.S. gallon, I'll let you do the math.
    Get the Milepost book. It is the bible of the whole highway.
    Temperatures were between 20 and 40f and we had great weather most of the time. We were able to camp out of the back of our suburban for all but 2 nights.
    Don't pass by Liard Hotsprings in Northern B.C. We were the first to camp in the park's campground after breaking trail through about 3 feet of corn snow. Only got stuck for about 5 minutes and dug out.
    The natural pool is huge, and one end is so hot that no one enters that area. The tempuratures get cooler from one end of the pool to the other.
    If you stay in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, consider having a meal in the town center, it is very nice. We camped at Takina Hotsprings, just outside of town. This place is also worth going to.
    We wanted to cross the boarder via the Northern route through Dawson City, Y.T. (Not Dawson Creek B.C.) We were told that the ferry that crosses the Yukon River was still frozen in, but an ice bridge was still intact. We were heading out of Whitehorse when someone who I'd sought advice from indicated that the customs crossing was only open on limited days. Things didn't quite work out like I'd hoped, but at least we saved a 400 mile round-trip.
    We crossed via the Alaska Highway instead.
    The overall trip was uneventful. The truck ran well, and we even saw a cool moose skelaton lying next to the road.
    Saw lots of wildlife, (alive).
    The weather was awesome, and we had a great time.
    If you make this trip, don't do it in 4 days. Allow plenty of time for some enjoyment. There is a lot to see.
     

Share This Page