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Help!!!!! Timing

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 2High4U, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. 2High4U

    2High4U 1/2 ton status

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    My 73 was converted to HEI and everything is hooked up correctly(hooked up to ignition on fuse box with a new wire etc. the problem is that im not sure where the timing should be set at and if i should unhook the vacume advance or not while timing it much info needed I cant seem to get it to run right.
    the motor is stock with a 1406 edelbog carb
     
  2. alf4444

    alf4444 1/2 ton status

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    I'm running the same setup and I'm running 9 degrees with the vac attached
     
  3. Mad-Dog

    Mad-Dog 1/2 ton status

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    Yep, disconnect the vacuum and plug the carb port.........
    set the initial at your desired advance degree and put it together.
    If you can't get it to run just right then maybe the problem lies elsewhere, if you run a healthy cam then a vacuum gauge is a suitable technique for setting the base timing.

    Install 1 medium spring from a curve kit on the mechanical weights then order a 10 degree vacuum canister from http://www.SDPC2000.com
    The factory canister has way too much advance for any performance application.

    Most p/u trucks are heavy and accellerate slower than lighter vehicles with the same amount of power so we want the advance to come in a little slower by using the ported vacuum source on the carb.
    Lighter vehicles or high-powered engines enjoy a faster advance curve because they pull the same load with less effort so the engine wants more advance at the same rpm...........see where I'm going with this, good.

    To the point where total timing is achieved by 3,000 rpm,
    toy with the springs and install 2 mediums if it does'nt like 1 light and 1 medium.

    A healthy starting system is mandatory so any slow or hard cranking can be traced back to a touch too much initial timing, engines that require lots of advance to make good power indicate a problem with the combustion process.

    There's a lot of power to be found in fine-tuning the ignition ,be patient, have fun and good luck :bow:
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2005
  4. 2High4U

    2High4U 1/2 ton status

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    another timing fuel issue

    ok i got that thanks very usefull... but i have a new problem now i bought a new fuel pump because the electric one stopped pumping while on the road so i beat it with something and it started again it wasnt filling up my fuel filter all that much. but when i got home i replaced with a new mechanical one, i looked at it when i rev it really high all the fuel seems like it doesnt come fast enough almost looks empty initially it ran super good for like 5 min and now it seems slow again so im gonna reset my timing and maybe buy a curve kit like you suggested. only seems to mess up when it gets warm any other suggestions or thoughts on my situation
     
  5. Mad-Dog

    Mad-Dog 1/2 ton status

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    I gathered that you're using a electric and mechanical pump together plumbed in series to pull fuel from the tank.................i see a problem here.
    Most electric pumps must be submerged to operate correctly, they are designed to push liquids but the rotary vane design was not created to pull liquids up from a source.
    Mechanical pumps are positive displacement sump pumps that work well as engine mounted units to pull fuel from the source and deliver it to the carb.
    You should use 1 or the other but there is no need to use both, fuel pressure should be checked at the entrance to the carb with a minimum of 5 psi and maximum of 7 psi.

    Any time liquid is pulled from a source some air will be present with the liquid, that's why the filter never fills completely when a mechanical pump is used.............
    on the same note if a submerged electric pump was used there would be no air mixed with the fuel and the filter would be full but you would have to regulate the pressure so the float valve was not overcome by excessive pressure :bow:
     

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