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hey guys, we need to create a safety checklist...

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by solowookie, Nov 20, 2001.

  1. solowookie

    solowookie 1/2 ton status

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    after reading the not to do's list, and thinking about it overnight I felt we need do the following; we all need to help create a safety checklist.

    for example when disconnecting fuel lines alway make sure they are capped! [​IMG]

    I'd like this list to comprise any job being done example disconnecting the drivelines (or I do this most of the time) make sure you block the tires. after getting the vehicle on jack stands push the vehicle to make sure it is secure etc.

    the list wouldn't need to comprise any job, but would need to include when doing a certain thing verify this etc.

    we can make up a ck5 checklist, and go through it as a sanity check when doing certain jobs so we know we are making sure safety comes first.

    <font color=blue> Jeff - may the force be with you</font color=blue>
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Jeffs-Stuff>link to k5's</a>
     
  2. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Like checking for fuel leaks when welding [​IMG][​IMG]?

    See my rig at <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Leadfoot> click here </a>
     
  3. chevyracing

    chevyracing 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
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    1) Gas
    2) oil
    3) beer
    4) tool box
    5) beer
    6) duct tape
    7) beer
    8) tire plugs
    9) beer
    10) extra axel shafts
    11) beer

    Like to go sloppin' 'round in da mud in a rapid fashion....=)

    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/albun31?&page=1>See my pics here</a>
     
  4. JunkYardCrawler

    JunkYardCrawler 1/2 ton status

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    if your welding next to a fuel leak you'll find it anyways [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  5. solowookie

    solowookie 1/2 ton status

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    yea leadfoot... like checking for fuel leaks when welding... [​IMG] (don't know if you'd done that too or not! [​IMG][​IMG])

    <font color=blue> Jeff - may the force be with you</font color=blue>
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Jeffs-Stuff>link to k5's</a>
     
  6. shawnboy

    shawnboy 1/2 ton status

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    That is a great idea Jeff. We can run it with the Ultimate Boonie Kit Checklist. This list can be found at
    &lt;a target="_blank" href=http://www.emaginethis.net/eotrailblazers/offroadtech/howtoo/boonie/kit.htm&gt;www.emaginethis.net/eotrailblazers/offroadtech/howtoo/boonie/kit.htm&lt;/a&gt;
    I think that one of the most important things to have on your list is to remember to disconnect the -terminal on the battery when you are looking for those fuel leaks.
    Shawnboy.

    <font color=red>If you are having too much fun it's probably illegal.</font color=red>
     
  7. solowookie

    solowookie 1/2 ton status

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    I'm not talking about a trail check list, but rather a shop checklist... there are pleny of trail check lists out there.

    <font color=blue> Jeff - may the force be with you</font color=blue>
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Jeffs-Stuff>link to k5's</a>
     
  8. chevyracing

    chevyracing 1/2 ton status

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    Good idea to disconnect battery when welding on truck too.

    John

    Like to go sloppin' 'round in da mud in a rapid fashion....=)

    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/albun31?&page=1>See my pics here</a>
     
  9. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Scary but yes [​IMG]. I had a rag soaked in water to cover some taillight wires that were nearby when I was welding a shock mount on a truck. I noticed a little puddle on the floor and thought it was just water. It wasn't until I was done that a fellow co-worker of where I used to work (it was the work truck I was fixing) said, oh by the way watch out for the leaking fuel tank. I felt like saying *in my best Adam Sandler impersonation voice* "that's something you should have told me YESTERDAY". The idiot was our normal delivery guy and he knew I had to reweld the mount (I am no expert by any means at welding, but I can do some basics), but conveniently didn't mention the leak. I wiped up the puddle with a rag right after he said that and sure enough it was gas *Homer Simpson voice* DUOH!!!. It is more my fault though because I should have checked myself BEFORE I started welding. Luckily nothing happened but it could have been disasterous.

    See my rig at <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Leadfoot> click here </a>
     
  10. 4x4_76

    4x4_76 1/2 ton status

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    I was welding gate to someones front yard couple of years ago in a metalwork shop.Well,there was these two guys who were fixing a lawn mower,and they drained fuel tank to sink!!
    I didn't see that,it didn't even came to my mind that someone could be so stupid.So,when I was grinding welds smooth,few sparks flew into sink and it was instantly on fire.It was extinguished fast so no harm was done.But it gave a good lesson;when ever you are welding,grinding or what ever were is possibly risk of fire,MAKE SURE THERE IS NO OPEN CONTAINERS WHERE MAY BE FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS.Also,check trash cans,they catch fire fast if there is greasy rag etc.

    I'm too lazy to stick shift,that's why I prefer autotranny.
     
  11. shawnboy

    shawnboy 1/2 ton status

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    Jeff, I know that there are a lot of trail lists out there. A shop list and a trail list under the CK5 banner is what I'm proposing. You know, one that we can call our own. Anyway, great idea.
    Shawnboy.

    <font color=red>If you are having too much fun it's probably illegal.</font color=red>
     
  12. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch 1/2 ton status

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    Hey Chevy... I think you forgot these 3 [​IMG]...

    12. Even MORE frigg'n BEER!
    13. Spare U-jt's
    14. Big bottle of jack!!! LOL

    And the sad part is that is just for wrenching in your garage [​IMG] LMAO! Of course no alcohol is taken when wheel'n. That is what the night after is for LOL.

    -Mikey
    1987 Chevy K5 Blazer- 350 TBI
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/captcrunch>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/captcrunch</a>
     
  13. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch 1/2 ton status

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    Ok seriously... The necessaties I must have for my garage are...

    1. Radio... need to be able to rock out! [​IMG]
    2. First aid kit and Fire Estinguisher
    3. Safety glasses, resporator, and hearing protection.
    4. Air Compressor and common air tools
    5. Oxy/Acet setup and welder mask.
    6. The right hand tools for the job! (Wrenches... ratchets... blah blah blah)
    7. Multimeter, test light, and test leads.
    8. Numerous jacks, jackstands, blocks, etc.
    9. High quality Torque Wrench
    10. The correct and up to date info for the rig you are working on (torque specs, sequences, clearences, etc)

    I guess that would be my top 10... you may not need them all but man do they make the job easier and most of all less stressfull, painful, hard to do, and makes the whol job a lot more fun to do.

    -Mikey
    1987 Chevy K5 Blazer- 350 TBI
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/captcrunch>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/captcrunch</a>
     
  14. shawnboy

    shawnboy 1/2 ton status

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    Here you go guys and gals. Jeff, this is taken from a Haynes repair manual. I hope it helps in the creation of our own CK5 Safety List.
    Shawnboy.




    Safety first!

    Regardless of how enthusiastic you
    may be about getting on with the job at
    hand, take the time to ensure that your
    safety is not jeopardized. A moment’s lack of
    attention can result in an accident, as can
    failure to observe certain simple safety pre-
    cautions. The possibility of an accident will
    always exist, and the following points should
    not be considered a comprehensive list of all
    dangers. Rather, they are intended to make
    you aware of the risks and to encourage a
    safety conscious approach to all work you
    carry out on your vehicle.

    Essential DOs and DON’Ts
    DON’T rely on a jack when working under the
    vehicle. Always use approved jackstands to
    support the weight of the vehicle and place
    them under the recommended lift or support
    points.
    DON’T attempt to loosen extremely tight nuts
    (i.e. wheel lug nuts) while the vehicle is
    on a jack - it may fall.
    DON’T start the engine without first making
    sure that the transmission is in Neutral (or
    Park where applicable) and the parking brake
    is set.
    DON’T remove the radiator cap from a hot
    cooling system - let it cool or cover it with a
    cloth and release the pressure gradually.
    DON’T attempt to drain the engine oil until
    you are sure it has cooled to the point that it
    will not burn you.
    DON’T touch any part of the engine or ex-
    haust system until it has cooled sufficiently to
    avoid burns.
    DON’T siphon toxic liquids such as gasoline,
    antifreeze and brake fluid by mouth, or allow
    them to remain on your skin.
    DON’T inhale brake lining dust - it is poten-
    tially hazardous (see Asbestos below).
    DON’T allow spilled oil or grease to remain
    on the floor - wipe it up before someone slips
    on it.
    DON’T use loose fitting wrenches or other
    tools which may slip and cause injury.
    DON’T push on wrenches when loosening or
    tightening nuts or bolts. Always try to pull the
    wrench toward you. If the situation calls for
    pushing the wrench away, push with an open
    hand to avoid scraped knuckles if the wrench
    should slip.
    DON’T attempt to lift a heavy component
    alone - get someone to help you.
    DON’T rush or take unsafe shortcuts to finish
    a job.
    DON’T allow children or animals in or around
    the vehicle while you are working on it.
    DO wear eye protection when using power
    tools such as a drill, sander, bench grinder,
    etc. and when working under a vehicle.
    DO keep loose clothing and long hair well out
    of the way of moving parts.
    DO make sure that any hoist used has a safe
    working load rating adequate for the job.
    DO get someone to check on you periodically
    when working alone on a vehicle.
    DO carry out work in a logical sequence and
    make sure that everything is correctly assem-
    bled and tightened.
    DO keep chemicals and fluids tightly capped
    and out of the reach of children and pets.
    DO remember that your vehicle’s safety
    affects that of yourself and others. If in doubt
    on any point, get professional advice.

    Asbestos
    Certain friction, insulating, sealing, and
    other products - such as brake linings, brake
    bands, clutch linings, torque converters, gas-
    kets, etc. - may contain asbestos. Extreme
    care must be taken to avoid inhalation of dust
    from such products, since it is hazardous to your
    health. If in doubt, assume that they do con-
    tain asbestos.

    Fire
    Remember at all times that gasoline is
    highly flammable. Never smoke or have any
    kind of open flame around when working on a
    vehicle. But the risk does not end there. A
    spark caused by an electrical short circuit, by
    two metal surfaces contacting each other, or
    even by static electricity built up in your body
    under certain conditions, can ignite gasoline
    vapors, which in a confined space are highly
    explosive. Do not, under any circumstances,
    use gasoline for cleaning parts. Use an
    approved safety solvent.
    Always disconnect the battery ground (-)
    cable at the battery before working on any
    part of the fuel system or electrical system.
    Never risk spilling fuel on a hot engine or
    exhaust component. It is strongly recom-
    mended that a fire extinguisher suitable for
    use on fuel and electrical fires be kept handy
    in the garage or workshop at all times. Never
    try to extinguish a fuel or electrical fire with
    water.

    Fumes
    Certain fumes are highly toxic and can
    quickly cause unconsciousness and even
    death if inhaled to any extent. Gasoline vapor
    falls into this category, as do the vapors from
    some cleaning solvents. Any draining or
    pouring of such volatile fluids should be done
    in a well ventilated area.
    When using cleaning fluids and sol-
    vents, read the instructions on the container
    carefully. Never use materials from unmarked
    containers.
    Never run the engine in an enclosed
    space, such as a garage. Exhaust fumes con-
    tain carbon monoxide, which is extremely
    poisonous. If you need to run the engine,
    always do so in the open air, or at least have
    the rear of the vehicle outside the work area.
    If you are fortunate enough to have the
    use of an inspection pit, never drain or pour
    gasoline and never run the engine while the
    vehicle is over the pit. The fumes, being
    heavier than air, will concentrate in the pit
    with possibly lethal results.

    The battery
    Never create a spark or allow a bare
    light bulb near a battery. They normally give
    off a certain amount of hydrogen gas, which
    is highly explosive.
    Always disconnect the battery ground
    cable at the battery before working on the
    fuel or electrical systems.
    If possible, loosen the filler caps or
    cover when charging the battery from an
    external source (this does not apply to sealed
    or maintenance-free batteries). Do not
    charge at an excessive rate or the battery
    may burst.
    Take care when adding water to a non
    maintenance-free battery and when carrying
    a battery. The electrolyte, even when diluted,
    is very corrosive and should not be allowed
    to contact clothing or skin.
    Always wear eye protection when clean-
    ing the battery to prevent the caustic
    deposits from entering your eyes.

    Household current
    When using an electric power tool,
    inspection light, etc., which operates on
    household current, always make sure that the
    tool is correctly connected to its plug and
    that, where necessary, it is properly
    grounded. Do not use such items in damp
    conditions and, again, do not create a spark
    or apply excessive heat in the vicinity of fuel
    or fuel vapor.

    Secondary ignition system
    voltage
    A severe electric shock can result from
    touching certain parts of the ignition system
    (such as the spark plug wires) when the
    engine is running or being cranked, particu-
    larly if components are damp or the insulation
    is defective. In the case of an electronic igni-
    tion system, the secondary system voltage is
    much higher and could prove fatal.


    <font color=red>If you are having too much fun it's probably illegal.</font color=red>
     

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