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Hey Mudzer or anyone who....

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by ftn96, Mar 20, 2001.

  1. ftn96

    ftn96 1/2 ton status

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    Has used one of those Proform Pinion depth gauges. Mudzer I remember that you had ordered one. Im confused on the directions for the setup adn the 2 extra arm pieces. The directiosn are far from explicate. I understand that you have attaach the extention for your application adn use the conjoining adjustment tube, But My real question is, Am I setting the little guage that records the 10ths or the actually outside one that shows you the thousandths? But that one can be set with the screw and rotating. Maybe I had to hard a day at work, but Im stumped.

    Hep me.....

    Will work for beer, parts and tools.
    90 Jimmy 350TBI-700R4-241-33" BFGs-10 bolts w/4.10's
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.nashvillek5.freeservers.com>http://www.nashvillek5.freeservers.com</A>
     
  2. Mudzer

    Mudzer 1/2 ton status Author

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    Ok, the Proform Gauge has some pretty good instructions, but it is also nice to have some advice. I got most of my info from Randys Ring and Pinion Service. Heres how to use the tool:

    First mount the collet to the flat-thin bar with threads. Next slide the gauge into the collet and hand tighten. You will have to determine which gauge extension you will be using. The gauge extensions go as follows. First measure your bearing race O.D. using a dial caliper. After determining bearing race O.D., divide this number by 1/2 and record that number on a piece of paper. This number will determine the gauge extension you will use for the first part of the measurement. Lets say the O.D. measurement was 3.250". Half would be 1.625". You would then use a 1" extension on the Dial Indicator. The Dial Indicator when fully compressed measures 1", by adding another inch, this will be more than the measurement desired (2.000"). Next you will use the shortest calibration tool (2.000") and set your collet where the dial indicator reads 0.000". To do this, you would slip the calibration tool over the shaft of the dial indicator, then compress the calibration tool to the face of the flat plate and hold it tightly. Next move the dial indicator in the collet until you are pretty close to 0.000" (really 2.000"), while holding the calibration tool and the indicator at close to 0.000", you would lightly tighten the collet until the dial indicator was tight. Now, with this calibration tool and indicator compressed together, rotate the dial to 0.000" to set the indicator to zero. I checked this several times by compressing the tool together to check it. Now that you have set the tool to zero or realistaclly 2.000", you can measure the inside face of the carrier bearing surface. Set the bar of the indicator onto the flat portion of the bearing cap mating surface. Measure down into the carrier bearing surface and record the deepest measurement. Write this number down. Now, if this measurement is more than 1.625", this means your bearing cap mating surface is not centered with the bearing (axle) centerline. Since you are trying to actually find bearing centerline to pinion face (this will be actual pinion depth), you will need to figure the difference between actual bearing centerline and bearing cap mating surface (measuring platform). Since this measurement was found to be more than 1.625" (lets say 1.645"), you will need to subtract 1.625" from 1.702" and record the number (.020"). Now you have determined that the bearing cap mating surface is .020" out from the centerline of the bearng. You will use this number in figuring the pinion depth, so write this down, this is a very important number. When you do this measurement on a new or used set of gears, you have to make a judgement call and install some shims on the pinion then press on the bearing. To get it close, I used the same amount of shims as my factory setup used. Next, you would install the pinion without grease, into the housing with bearings, but without crush sleeve. Install your yoke and old nut, and tighten the pinion down until you get no end play on the pinion. Next you will use the pinion depth setting tool adaptors to check pinion depth. Install the shortest adaptor to your bearing mating surface (preferrably the same surface you checked with earlier). You will install this bracket with the "U" shaped slot with a bolt into the main cap bolt hole. I found a shorter bolt the required size and had a flat washer so I would not mar the surface of the tool. Next get the longer bar with threads on one end and the wing bolt provided. In the shorter tool there is a hole in the other end. Mount the longer bar (measuring surface) on the inside of the shorter bar and secure with the wing bolt. This should put the bearing cap mating surface parallel with the measuring surface. Next you will read the pinion face for the recommended pinion depth. After recording this number on your paper, get the appropriate extension and re-calibrate your dial indicator as described above. Again, you will be using a longer extension than the measurement requires IE: recommended pinion depth 2.625", you will use a 3" measurement or 2" extension on the dial indicator. After calibrating, measure both sides of the pinion surface across the centerline to determine if the measuring surface is "square", if this surface is not square, you will have to shim the measuring bar until it is square. I had to and I chose paper to do it. Now that both sides of the pinoin surface are showing close or square, you are ready to do your measurement. Measure from the measuring surface by placing the dial indicator on the surface and hold firmly and allow the dial indicator rod touch the pinion surface. Record this measurement. Take this number and ADD the .020" to it to determine pinion depth. The good news is, you are done only if the measurement is right on or within a .001"-.002" (my preference). The bad news is, you are not done if the measurement is not close within .002". If its not close, you will have to remove the pinion, remove the bearing from the pinion and either add or subtract shims to move it in the correct distance that you are OFF. Email me if you have any more questions and I hope this helps.

    Mudzer 1978/91 K5
    <font color=blue>www.mudzer.coloradoK5.com</font color=blue>
     
  3. ftn96

    ftn96 1/2 ton status

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    Damn Mudz, thats an informative set of directions for this tool. But you still didn't answer my question. DO I set the little guage that measures the 10ths, or do I cal the "glass" to read 0.00 when fully compressing the cal tube to the bottom of the flat suface? I understand the finding the line bore difference of the race retainer cap.

    Thanks Bro.

    Will work for beer, parts and tools.
    90 Jimmy 350TBI-700R4-241-33" BFGs-10 bolts w/4.10's
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.nashvillek5.freeservers.com>http://www.nashvillek5.freeservers.com</A>
     

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