Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Home made 14 bolt wheel spacers?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BlitzK5, Sep 26, 2005.

  1. BlitzK5

    BlitzK5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Posts:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
    Anyone make home made spacers to try to match the rear axle width with the front? I was thinking of cutting off the flange of a old 3/4 ton 10 bolt rotor and grinding it flat and then put it between the hub and the rim on my 14bolt FF. It will only add about an 1/2" on each side but its better then nothing. what do you guys think? Anyone know why they made these axles 3" narrower in the back then the front anyways?
     
  2. atho

    atho 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Posts:
    1,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wayne County, Ohio
    Why are you so worried about it?
     
  3. BlitzK5

    BlitzK5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Posts:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
    Well for one thing I dont like the look and the wider it is the better stablility you will get.
     
  4. clarkjw24

    clarkjw24 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2003
    Posts:
    3,531
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    McBee, SC 29101
    I'm sure you could make that work but 1/2" on both sides won't accomplish much. Maybe just find a van width 14bff.
     
  5. 73k5blazer

    73k5blazer Unplug the matrix cable from the back of your head Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    Posts:
    4,987
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    The Rustbelt
    You need to ensure absolute flatness and perfect parallel surfaces. A grinder won't give you that. If you don't get it right, even just the slightest bit out, when you bolt the wheel down it will bend (if alum wheel, it could crack) to conform, ruining the wheel, making it wobble. That wheel will then be difficult to balance, will wear the tire very un-uniformily, make the whole truck shake (these CK vehciles don't need any more of that!).
     
  6. 73k5blazer

    73k5blazer Unplug the matrix cable from the back of your head Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    Posts:
    4,987
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    The Rustbelt
    That's not entirely true. All depends on vehicle dynamics. At highway speeds, engineers spend alot of time tuning track and width to provide a stabil vehicle. Alot of vehicles have a slightly narrower rear for better stability, and some for aerodynamics. No one really knows why these CK trucks have it, lots of people have their opinions, but you'd need an engineer from GM from the late 60's when these trucks were designed to get a real answer. I'm sure it's not by chance though, it's there deliberatly and my bet would be better on-road handling.
    If you not running your truck on road, none of this matters.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2005
  7. BlitzK5

    BlitzK5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Posts:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
    The thing is they would already be flat. The only part you would cut and grind down is the metal peices that connect the mounting flange to the rotor. As long as there grinded down flush with the inner flange there would be no issues.
     
  8. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Posts:
    14,681
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    High velocity, Low altitude
    I thought that the rear was more narrow to help the turning radius? (which is already pretty wide)
     

Share This Page