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Home oil burner plumbing

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by newyorkin, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    I'd like to replace me oil burner lines, the ones that run from the tanks to the burners.

    Anyone know if I can use regular 1/2" copper? It looks like the original lines are copper with copper or brass fittings. They leak like crazy at all the fittings, so I'd like to just put in a nice new run of 1/2" copper (about 30'), then have it break out to the boiler burner and the water heater burner in the normal 1/4" flexible tubing. I figure the filters would be better off in rigid pipe than the flexi tubing anyway.



    Anyone know if this is ok? Will oil eat through the solder or the solder pollute the oil or anything batty like that? There's seems to be no info about this on the web that I can find.
     
  2. 3 on the tree

    3 on the tree 1/2 ton status

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    Your local building inspector's office would be your best source for this info. There are so many different codes being used in the US, that what is legal here in Colorado might not be kosher in New York.
     
  3. blasterD

    blasterD 1/2 ton status

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    I used to help my dad install this stuff. I'm not sure of the reason, but we always used the flexible copper with flare fittings. 3 on the tree is right. Your local building inspector's office would be your best source for this info. Every state has a different building code.
     
  4. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    you can use flex copper lines regular plubing lines and use compresion fittings found for water in the plubing section of any hardware store.

    as far as useing ridgid lines and sweating them togeather, i havent hurd or seen this done, only the flex.

    repairing sweated lines after the fact would be interesting.:eek1:
     
  5. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    Ahh, good point... I guess I'll just change the existing fittings and leave the lines alone.

    Thanks for the info. Local code is another resource I forgot about, but I don't think I'll bother if I'm not going to completely replace the lines...
     
  6. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    i dont know about the local code.

    Have you ever read the building code? it is NOT a construction manual it is a legal book, the mose you wou ever find is somthing like, #.2.6.1 a) All oil burning devices must be conected in acordance with fdbc# 453.2

    maybe a graph of some kind.

    and if you talked to someone in the office they would just tell you that someone qualifyed should hook it up.
     
  7. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    How our is piped..and BEWARE of the building inspector!

    The guy who installed our new furnace in 2001 used "soft" copper tubing that comes in rolls--I have seen it at Lowe's and Home Depot..its connected with single flare fittings--he didn't use any compression fittings,but I assume they would work fine--no pressure in those lines,just suction from the pump..not sure if they are legal in all states or areas though..

    The "inspector" bitched the guy who installed our furnace and tank should have put cement OVER the copper tubing where it ran along the wall!--said it might get damaged somehow!--I doubt it!..(EDIT!) --he comprimised by letting him put flexible conduit over it instead--(We had put a new 250 gal.tank in the garage next to the furnace room,because our old underground tank was 25 years old,and we feared it might leak soon,so we did it all at once--didn't take the underground tank out yet--but we will have too if the propery goes up for sale..

    He also did not like the tank being paralell to where a car would park in the garage,he was afraid a car might hit it as it was pulling in the garage--he nearly made the contractor bore holes in the concerete slab,and put cement filled pipe in front of the tank,as a "gaurd rail"..I said "we have NEVER parked a car in here ,EVER!--he didn't care he said"That don't mean whoever else might live here won't"...I see his point,but geezz,talk about anal!..he let it slide anyhow..

    I'd go to a library and look up the codes,or see what a oil burner repairman would use(IF you can get one to answer any questions !!)..I learned to avoid the building inspectors in my area like a leper--once he gets wind of you thinking of fixing something yourself,he'll come snooping around..

    The following is a bit off topic,but might apply to your situation--I think you should read this... :rolleyes:

    I make the mistake of asking the building/electrical inspector if I could wire my garage myself (I'd gotten a building permit 2 weeks before.and I just asked!!)..a few days later I get a notice from the electrical inspector,demanding to know who wired my garage!-- :rolleyes:
    I went back to his office,and told him I only had gotten the building permit 2 weeks before,and I hadn't even broken ground for the foundation yet!. :surepal: :angry1: .he said to let him know as soon as the building was up,and wiring was going to be installed--

    I asked him if I could wire it,as I had gone to vocational school,and knew how too,I took 3 years of Industrial Maintenece,and part of our shop class was wiring,2 and 3 way switches,etc..he didn't give me an answer,more like a grunt..then he said "I would recommend you hire a contractor"..but he DIDN'T say "NO"...

    I learned you CAN do it yourself--but if your not a licenced electrician/contractor,they bust your balls pretty bad--VERY anal about everything if YOU do it,whereas the "guys in the trade" get quite a bit of slack,from what I've heard others say who have built garages nearby..

    One guy told me the inspector wouldn't give much advice on HOW or WHAT to use for wire,conduit,etc(and neither would electricians he called unless they were hired to do the work! :doah: )..but the inspector was glad to fail his work for "improper materials"--he had to rip out a lot of conduit and wiring and do it over 3 times before he finally signed off on the permit--after the guy told him he'd see him in court if he "failed" him again! :mad: :screwy:

    So I'd avoid tipping off the inspector about any changes you plan to make to your oil burner lines!..I'd just see if I could find out the proper stuff to use,and do it to code,and tell nobody...SSSHHHHH! :whistle:

    My garage never did get "real" wiring..I still run it from a heavy duty extension cord plugged into an outlet in the house 's garage,that has a 15 amp breaker--I don't use much more than a few lights,and one or two tools out there at a time..my welder runs off the house as well..so after 13 years,I haven't "hard wired" it yet... :blush: :whistle: :tongue1: ..I'd like too someday,but I'm not sure I'll even BE here much longer,nevermind pay the electric bill... :(
     

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