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how difficult is it to install a torque converter?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by xnoahx, Jun 29, 2001.

  1. xnoahx

    xnoahx 1/2 ton status

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    To go with the mods that i have done to the engine i think i would like to install a higher stall speed converter but before i decide either way, i was wondering how difficult it would be to install myself. the obvious problem would be unbolting the tranny and supporting it. does the job require special tools? or is it something that i should just forget about doing myself?

    Check out my 73 K5 http://members.theglobe.com/xnoahx/73k5.htm
     
  2. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Requires two special tools. That is, two strong arms.

    Unbolt tranny, slide it back, grab torque converter, pull off, push new one on, spin it a few times to make sure it engages the front pump properly, slide tranny forward, bolt up, and enjoy!

    Tim
    '84 Chevy K10, lifted, loud, fast, and 3/4 ton axles
     
  3. shawnboy

    shawnboy 1/2 ton status

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    If you use your rig for trails or rockin' you will want to go to a lower stall. The reason being you want things to happen sooner not later.
    Shawnboy.
     
  4. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Remove both driveshafts. Disconnect any wires, vacuum lines, and/or speedo cable from the trans and t-case. Disconnect shift linkage from the tranny. Remove the t-case shifter or linkage. Remove the dipstick tube from the tranny. Disconnect cooler lines from the tranny. Support the tranny and t-case with a jack. Remove the crossmember and the unbolt the tranny from the engine. Move the tranny and t-case down and back until there is clearance to remove the torque converter.

    I would replace the front seal at this time, since you're in there anyway. Lube up the snout on the new torque converter so it doesn't damage the new seal. As stated earlier, make sure that you rotate the torque converter several times, while pushing it towards the rear of the trans. You'll usually feel it slide further into the transmission pump twice as everything lines up.

    Reinstall all the stuff that you removed. If the torque converter touches the flexplate before the trans is fully seated against the engine, STOP!!! There should be some clearance. If there isn't, then it means that the torque converter is NOT fully seated into the pump. If you force fit it and then bolt everything up, the pump will be destroyed as soon as you start the engine. [​IMG] Drop it back down and spin the torque converter some more until it's fully seated. When it's done right, you should have to slide the torque converter slightly forward to bolt it to the flexplate, after the trans is bolted to the engine.

    <font color=black>HarryH3 - '75 K5</font color=black>
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  5. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    I dont think a higer stall torque converter is really needed in a 4x4 unless you are planning to use it in the drag races mud bogs or competition. A higher stall speed converter basically just gets you off the line quicker by allowing the engine to reach a higher rpm before applying full power and torque to the wheels.
    Even a mild converter has a stall speed of 2000 rpm. any speed below this and the converter is slipping and generating heat. A lot of 4 wheeling is done at low rpm so a slipping converter will just be generating excess heat that your tranny does not like.
    Most stock converters have a stall speed of around 1500-1800 rpm which is just about ideal for off roading.
    A higher stall converter will help you are having performance problems like a bad bog off the line or a stall when shifting into gear from idle. Many high performance engines do need a higher stalll to run right. but in a 4x4 I would never use more stall than is needed to make it run right.

    <font color=orange>GOT HORSEPOWER?</font color=orange>
     
  6. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I agree thunder.

    Tim
    '84 Chevy K10, lifted, loud, fast, and 3/4 ton axles
     
  7. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    Hey thunder, but what about this situation:

    I was going downhill pretty steep in a rocky trail. I went down some sort of step and my front bumper rubbed the rocks. I tried to back off, but even in 4lo, the Blazer wouldn't move. I saw my tach raising up to 1500rpm, but no further. I couldn't move it no matter how much I floored it. I was embarassed. A guy was laughing because he thought I was attempting to move in hi gear.

    In this situation, wouldn't a 1800-2000rpm stall help better? Or should I simply shut up and hurry up and swap my 454 engine?

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  8. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    You got a point there 79. Being able to get higher up on your torque curve may have helped you pull out of that situation. But so would more power and lower gears. Were you running tall tires and 3.08 gear ratio maby? You should be able to turn your tires over in low range.
    Here is a defination of stall speed:
    Stall speed is the amount of engine rpm that can be attained at full throttle with brakes locked and transmission in gear before the driving wheels turn. The stall is only attainable if the brakes can hold the vehicle.
    If you cant turn your tires over sitting in one spot in low range a tired engine, wrong gears for tires or a tranny problem may be the issue.


    <font color=orange>GOT HORSEPOWER?</font color=orange>
     

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