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How do I completely flush out all tranny fluid with pan off??

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Bross82, Mar 2, 2003.

  1. Bross82

    Bross82 1/2 ton status

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    Hey, after I parked my truck the night i had no oil pressure... over the next week it decided it was gonna leak from the front of the tran. pan and make a decent enough puddle for not being started all week.

    So I'm gonna replace the gasket AGAIN...did it a year ago, but this time i want to actually get all of the fluid out and not just whats in the pan. is it much harder? what should the tran. pan bolts be torqued back down to? how much atf is needed for a full atf flush? partial? i dont remember, but i think i was around 4-6 containers for a partial.

    thanks,
    matt
     
  2. ed1507

    ed1507 Registered Member

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    realy there is no way to flush it unless there is a drain on your conveter or you remove the hole tranny and change the converter u can change the fluid then change it again in a few weeks to try to get every thing out hope this helps a little ed. 85k5 305 /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif /forums/images/graemlins/usaflag.gif
     
  3. Highlander

    Highlander 1/2 ton status

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    Well first off you can't get all the ATF out by just doing to pan you can get a little more if you pull the filter but not much, Most of the ATF is in your converter.
    B&M say to tighten the pan bolts to 12-13ft lbs as for ATF fluid it should take about 2gal or more to flush you tranny Here is some info on flushing your tranny.

    1. Make sure the fluid is warm. Warm up the car so the transmission is at normal operating temperature. Pull the transmission dipstick (located near the firewall in most cars). Fresh fluid is translucent and cherry red. Some darkening is normal, but if it is reddish brown or mustard color and smells like burnt varnish, it is worn out.
    2. Drain the fluid by loosening the pan. Select the correct Hastings filter replacement based on pan shape and prepare a large pan to catch the fluid. Then loosen each pan bolt a turn or two and loosen one corner more than rest. Drain mostly from this corner.
    3. Finish removing the pan and any gasket material from the pan or case. Avoid scratching the metal and make sure the pan’s gasket surface isn’t bent or distorted.
    4. Remove the old filter. Most transmission filters are held in place with a bolt or two, but some are held by a clip. Be careful to include O-Rings or other seals.
    5. Install a new filter. Use the clips or bolts from the old filter. Be sure O-Rings, etc. are in place. If the filter has a long intake neck, gently push the neck into place without unseating the O-Ring.
    6. Clean the pan thoroughly. Inspect the pan before cleaning. A small amount of fine grey clutch dust is normal. However, if you find metal shavings, there has been transmission damage. Clean the pan with solvent and wipe dry so there is no harmful residue.
    7. Position gasket on pan. Some gaskets have four holes slightly smaller than the rest to allow four bolts through the pan and through these smaller holes to hold the gasket in place.
    8. Hand tighten pan bolts in a criss-cross pattern. After that, use a torque wrench to tighten bolts to proper ft-lbs as per manufacturer.
    9. Refill the transmission using only the amount shown as “refill capacity” in the owners manual or "AMSOIL Product Selection Guide,” using the type of fluid specified for the vehicle.
    10. If doing only a partial fluid replacement, skip to instruction 12 below. If doing a complete fluid replacement, follow the steps in instruction 11.
    11. You now have replaced the fluid in the pan. To replace the fluid in the torque converter and oil cooler also, follow these steps.
    Step 1. Obtain the total system capacity of the vehicle from the manufacturer or AMSOIL. Have this amount readily available.

    Step 2. Disconnect the oil cooler line from the oil cooler. As you may not know which is the pressure side and which is the return side, have both directed so the stream of fluid will be directed toward a receptacle.

    Step 3. With another person, be prepared to add ATF to the fill area as it is being pumped out of the oil cooler line.

    Step 4. Start the engine, and as the old fluid is pumped out, add fresh fluid to the pan.

    Step 5. When either the fluid color brightens or the total capacity has been replaced, shut the engine off and re-attach the oil cooler line. All fluids has now been changed.

    12. Recheck the fluid level. With the car on level ground, set the parking brake and the transmission in “Park” or “Neutral.” Let the engine idle for a few minutes. Shift the transmission into different positions before returning the lever to “Park” or “Neutral.” Check the fluid level again and check for leaks.

    And for very good ATF Check out Amsoil

    I hope this helps


    Eric
     
  4. 79Beast

    79Beast 1/2 ton status

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    GOOD answer! And I was gonna go to somewhere with one of those machines that pumps out the old fluid and puts in new and PAY them to put in my Amsoil tranny fluid. You just saved me some cash.
     
  5. bpiccioni

    bpiccioni 1/2 ton status

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    Eric

    Pretty convincing numbers listed on the Amsoil site concerning the temperature tolerances of their ATF! However, I have always heard that putting synthetic oil in an older engine leads to the rapid deterioration of existing seals. I wonder if this is not the case for transmissions - do I risk turning an aging Turbo 400 in my /forums/images/graemlins/burb.gif into a leaky disaster by putting in a synthetic oil, even one as reputable as Amsoil?

    Thanks!

    Ben
     
  6. Highlander

    Highlander 1/2 ton status

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    Well I wanted to get you some more info on Synthetic Oil but I could not find what I wanted but I will say that It's not the Synthetic Oil that causes the deterioration of the seals it's really that in most cases the seals are already bad and the Synthetic Oil does not have the crap in it like Dino Oils to plug up the seals, I'm sure you know that with a Synthetic Oil your eng will run and be cleaner. Amsoil and I'm sure other as well start out with a Pure Base Stock which means they build the Oil from the ground up and only use what is needed, No wax or other stuff that turns into the sludge we all see in a older motor.
    Now I would say you should not have any problems going with Amsoil's ATF normal ATF is a highly Detergent oil anyway. A tranny does not get the same crap like blow by or dirt getting by the air filter.
    I know my aimless wondering didn't help here so when I get home tonight I'll see if I can find what I wanted to say in the first place as it was better said than me /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif


    Eric
     
  7. 79Beast

    79Beast 1/2 ton status

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    Putting Amsoil in your tranny will not do anything but help. The reason some engines tend to leak after going from conventional to synthetic is that conventional oils tend to leave deposits around seals as well as other moving and nonmoving parts. Running Amsoil for a few weeks will dissolve these deposits and Amsoil will not build up any deposits of its own. Without these deposits around the seals, a small amount of oil may leak out of worn seals. I personally put Amsoil 10W30 in my 160,000 Dodge Dakota after running various convetional oils and a few lesser synthetics and I have no more leaks than before. It still goes between oil changes without adding oil...and now my oil change interval is 25,000 miles or 1 year; with a filter change at 12,500 miles or 6 months. I will be going to Amsoil tranny fluid pretty soon.
     
  8. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I'd check and see if that "additive" that they now sell for "fixing" transmissions, is compatible with all synthetic fluids.

    If it is, even if you have problems after going with synthetic, you *might* be able to rectify them with the additive, but thats ONLY if it's compatible with the synthetic fluid.
     
  9. Highlander

    Highlander 1/2 ton status

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    I'm not sure but I think thats what I was trying to say /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif
    I need to get a temp gauge on my tranny just see whats it's doing. I used a infer-red(sp) temp gauge on my cooler lines and the return was about 160 and the inbound was like 195 at idle. I can't remember if that was before I but Amsoil or after, /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif


    Eric
     

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