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How do I measure my driveshaft to determine the correct length?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by CamaroZ85, Feb 27, 2003.

  1. CamaroZ85

    CamaroZ85 Registered Member

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    I'm getting an 86 K5 in a week or 2 from a guy that always comes into my store (I work in Auto Parts). It has a 3" body and 4" susp lift on it. I will be pulling out the body lift, but staying with the suspension lift. He thinks the drieveshafts need to be lengthened an inch or 2 each from the lift, but they are on there now and working. When I get it I'll see whats up with it, how the yokes are sitting on the slpines etc but I was wondering if there is any specific measuresments or formula I could use to determine the correct length. The truck was originally a 5 speed, but I sold him a POS rustbucket 78 a few years ago. Out of that he took the trans, case, rears and whatever else was needed to swap to an auto. So, it's basically got a 78 drivetrain. What options does that leave open as to what rears/case are in there? Im pretty sure the trans is a turbo 350. One more thing, how hard is it to lengthen the shaft? My dad runs a sheet metal shop and he's very knowledgeable and experienced in what he does. He also used to own a K5 so he's familiar with them. I would imagine he just has to cut the shaft, roll a piece of steel to the appropriate length/diameter and weld it in straight, correct? I haven't asked him about it but I'm sure he'll be able to do it. PS I did a quick search about the driveshaft but didnt come up with much.
     
  2. 73k10sub

    73k10sub 1/2 ton status

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  3. R72K5

    R72K5 Banned

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    you would have to find a longer shaft of same diameter and cut it down and then weld on your existing shaft ends from the current shaft, you cant or at least shouldnt just patch in a section of tube onto a shaft, youll have to have entire shaft assembly balanced when youre done welding
     
  4. BlaznRebel

    BlaznRebel 1/2 ton status

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    put the yoke in where it rode stock an measure from the center of the u-joint ends and go to the face for you pinion where your u-joint rings hold the u-joint in for the rear. i put a 6"lift on my truck and i drove it and wheeled it in mud, but when my first u-joint went i had a new shaft made. it was about 3 inches shorter than what i needed.

    Word of causion do not but the yoke all the way into the t-case. When you measure it, leave atlest a 1/2" to 1" of the yoke showing. This way when your suspension is moving up and down you wont slam the yoke into the t-case and brake it... Hope this helps i haven't done the front yet.
     

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