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How do I Pack 14 Bolt Bearings?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by reddog64, Sep 16, 2002.

  1. reddog64

    reddog64 1/2 ton status

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    Well...

    I enjoy doing matenance and need to check things out.... How do I pack the rear bearings?

    How do i get them out to pack I Guess the real question is...
     
  2. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    gear lube is what lubes the bearings on a full floater.
    No need to repack em.
    to inspect em just pull out the shafts and then the hubs, you can either fill the hub on installation or do what I do.
    when all is together just raise one side then the other for a few minutes, after you make sure that the diff is full of lube.
     
  3. thatK30guy

    thatK30guy 1 ton status Premium Member

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    What POWERMAD said..... /forums/images/icons/wink.gif

    Gear oil (80-90 weight) is what lubes the bearings in the 14FF. No packing grease in the bearings at all.
     
  4. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    As Powermad and ThatK30Guy stated you don't pack the 14FF bearings as they are lubed with the gear oil from the differential, but a good soaking in gear lube is a good idea if you have "cleaned" or degreased them so they don't start dry. A mechanic buddy of mine told me to lube them with friction modifier (the stuff added to gear oil when you have a limited slip differential) as it is compatable with gear lube and will not hurt (even if you don't have a limited slip). He said it is "stickier" than gear oil and since I was going to assemble the axle and not use it for a while, it would coat the bearings longer and aid at first use. Made sense to me at the time and I have had no problems with it.
     
  5. reddog64

    reddog64 1/2 ton status

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    sweet..
    I didnt know it was that easy /forums/images/icons/smile.gif

    Well i driove to work today.. the rear bearings are packed /forums/images/icons/smile.gif

    Cool that was easy... 6 pack time :d
     
  6. 73k5blazer

    73k5blazer Unplug the matrix cable from the back of your head Premium Member

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    I'm looking at my '73 service manual and it says to pack 'em with grease initially, even though they are lubed from the differential fluid.
    Don't know what it will accomplish, but I've always packed mine when taking them apart and putting them back together.

    BlazerMan
     
  7. jimmy88

    jimmy88 1/2 ton status

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    88 service manual says to pack em too. Guess thats the easy way for the manual writer to insure they have enough lube to start with. Can you see "Install hub on spindle and tighten nut. Install axle shaft. Jack truck to 45 degree angle and allow 30 seconds for gear oil to flow to wheel bearing. Repeat for other side. Smile at customer's puzzled look."

    Figure its cheap insurance, so I pack em.
     
  8. reddog64

    reddog64 1/2 ton status

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    I was just curious...
    I've always packed the front but never the rear.. so i guess next tiem i get a chance... i'll pack them initially...
     
  9. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Can you see "Install hub on spindle and tighten nut. Install axle shaft. Jack truck to 45 degree angle and allow 30 seconds for gear oil to flow to wheel bearing. Repeat for other side.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Actualy that is exactly what our service manuals say to do. /forums/images/icons/wink.gif
    But 45 deg is kinda extreme, if the diff is full then all it takes is a little bit.
    I work on full floating diffs on a regular basis and this is my routine.
    Pre lube inner bearing, install seal.
    mount hub and install pre lubed outer bearing( I used to fill the hub before but that just runs out all over the floor and makes a mess)
    install adjusting nut to spec and the lock nut.
    install shaft
    top off diff and raise one wheel about 2 inches (air over hydraulic jack)
    Park rig on the line and start next job.
    Out of the hundreds of hubs I have done this way I have never had a bearing failure.
    I am not saying that packing them with grease is a bad thing, but I think that white grease would be better since it will disolve and not turn into a gooy mess.
    That's what I use when I rebuild a gear box.
     
  10. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    It's to prevent dry startup. Most people clean the bearings when they are removed, and all the pooled oil ends up on the floor or in the oil catch can. This could be a bad thing at startup (dry), so they say to pack them initially with grease to keep that from happening (covering butts). If you pre-soak, and top-off imediately, you should be good to go. Packing them with grease is better than a dry start, but depending on the type of grease, I would be weary of what happens to the grease (gummy). Either way you should be fine, I was just stating what has worked for me in the past.
     
  11. jimmy88

    jimmy88 1/2 ton status

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    Yea, I was being a little sarcastic with that 45 degree comment. Like you said if the diff is full to begin with your procedure sounds fine. So far never had any sign of problems with standard wheel bearing grease, eventually washes out. Just gives me piece of mind, I can see they are lubed before everything is buttoned up.
     
  12. 79Beast

    79Beast 1/2 ton status

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    I have always used my finger to smear a light coat of grease onto the outside of the bearings before installation. I also raise each side individually with the rearend full and then top off after a short drive down the road.
     

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