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How hard is it to retube all the brakes?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Blazer79, Nov 21, 2002.

  1. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    As some of you may have read a few days ago, I just bled the newly installed brakes on my 14bff. But I found lots of rusty fluid everywhere. Even the MC has a layer of rusty slime on the fluid reservoirs. I can't imagine how bad the arteriosclerosis on my brake lines is. I took my daily driver Toyota to have all it's brake fluid sucked out with a vacuum machine, but I don't think this machine has the guts to remove all the rust in the Blazer, so I think it would be better if I simply replaced all the lines.

    Has anyone replaced all the metal lines? Is it a pain in the butt? Any problems? Do I need to drop the tranny and/or transfer case? What about bleeding afterwards? Does all the air come out?

    Any sugestions welcome.
     
  2. supersize75

    supersize75 1/2 ton status

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    I swaped all mine over to a new frame, the ended up just replacing them all, not to hard and I'm only 18, but then again I had the body off the truck. It isn't too hard just anoying to route them into place, if ya plan on getting a body lift this would be a great time to do them both because the added clearence between the cab and the frame alows for easier positioning. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif good luck!
     
  3. 75-K5

    75-K5 3/4 ton status

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    I replaced all the lines on my '68 C20. Yes it was a pain in the butt, but we didn't have to remove anything to do it. It may be different with the t-case being there though. Jus.t know it worked on a similar vehicle
     
  4. Butch

    Butch 1/2 ton status

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    Word for the day arteriosclerosis " Can you guys use this in a sentence /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
    I replaced a portion of mine and it was not too bad. As far as bleeding you will have to start with opening the bleeder and push the pedal to the floor and close it. Start at the tire closest to the master cylinder and work you way to the tire furthest away. After you get fluid in all the new lines then you can just bleed them. It will take some paitence though.
     
  5. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Had to look that one up /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />

    ar·te·ri·o·scle·ro·sis ( P ) Pronunciation Key (är-tîr--skl-rss)
    n.
    A chronic disease in which thickening, hardening, and loss of elasticity of the arterial walls result in impaired blood circulation. It develops with aging, and in hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and other conditions.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Fairly fitting for the problem lol.
    www.inlinetube.com can probably sell you a prebent kit.
    As far and bending your own. I't not hard at all. They have a tool for bending and the good one runs about $20. You will need a Double flare tool that runs about $25. Raw line is pretty cheap.
    Well here that's what it cost. Not sure what it will cost you down south of a few borders.
    If your lines have rust then I would also replace the Proportioning valve. I seem to recall you did disc brake rear. Dump the stock PV and go with an adjustable. It's cheaper and will give you better results.
    The local parts stores up here have a lot of pre made hard line. I have had to replace a few peices on my truck and usualy found what I needed for under $5 a peice.
     
  6. OneInTheSun

    OneInTheSun 1/2 ton status

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    I'm also getting ready to replace a good bit of line (for the past month now /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif).

    Quick dumb question: How necessary is the "spring wrap" around the lines? And by "necessary" I basically mean, how do I determine where/where not to use it.
     
  7. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    You know I don't have a good answer for that. I don't know if it acts as a heat sink or if it's there to offer some protection to the lines. Maybe it's for both. It makes sense that the fluid may build heat under often and heavy braking.
    Several of my lines have been replaced with non wrapped lines because they are not available with the wrap at the local parts store. I haven't noticed a difference. The factory lines are pretty well wraped from the PV to the wheels. The main lines out of the master I don't think are wrapped or at least the first foot or so isn't.
     
  8. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    Yeah, that's the disease you get when your cholesterol level is too high for too much time. Your arteries and veins get clogged up with fat, reducing the inner diameter, raising your blood pressure. That's what I was explained.

    I checked inlinetube. I think I can do my own lines for way less than $185. I just need the bender and the flare tool. Seems like I got a new project for after the D60 install.

    This addiction never ends!!! /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  9. DieselDan

    DieselDan 1/2 ton status

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    Go down to your local NAPA. They should have a rack of brake line with preformed flares/fittings on the ends. Stuff is cheap. I think the longest is 52" or 63", but they can be coupled. I've never had a line clog from rust but I had a few burst /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
     
  10. dammit32

    dammit32 1/2 ton status

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    The lines with the wrap on them can be bent by hand with no kinking
     
  11. TX Mudder

    TX Mudder 1/2 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />

    Yeah, that's the disease you get when your cholesterol level is too high for too much time. Your arteries and veins get clogged up with fat, reducing the inner diameter, raising your blood pressure. That's what I was explained.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Technically, with arteriosclerosis only arterioles and artieries get clogged.

    ABout the brake lines, if I had to redo them I'd do it myself vs. buying them ($$)
    I've bent a few hard lines and it is no big deal. You need a flare tool, cutting tool, and bending tool. I think you can get all for less than $15 together at Autozone. The unbent hard line is cheap too, a few bucks.
    -- Mike
     
  12. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Go down to your local NAPA. They should have a rack of brake line with preformed flares/fittings on the ends. Stuff is cheap. I think the longest is 52" or 63", but they can be coupled. I've never had a line clog from rust but I had a few burst




    [/ QUOTE ]
    Uhhh my bet is his closest NAPA is about 3,000 miles away in Texas. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  13. DieselDan

    DieselDan 1/2 ton status

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    DOOH! Guess I didn't catch that location line. /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif
     
  14. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    Yes, I'm too far away from your fancy shops, BUT, as a matter of fact we do have a "NAPA" over here with the same logo and everything, /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif but I doubt is related to the US Napa. All we have here are shops that always ask for a sample in order to find the right part, and most of the time, they come up with some cheap chineese crap. (no offense to any asian CK5ers, if they exist)

    I've seen those preflared lines at many "oil shops" as they are called here. That would be my first choice, since they are so cheap.

    But I just received my new Summit Catalog (along with my Energy Suspension T-case bushings and Detroit Locker from Randy's) and they sell a 20' roll of stainless steel brake line for about $27. I might go that route. Too bad I didn't realize I needed the line before I placed this order. They list different diameters: 3/16, 1/4, 5/16, 3/8. Which one is the one I need? Also, is 20' long enough?

    Thanks for all your input. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  15. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    A friend also told me that I could bend the line around something round with the right diameter, like a bottle, or a piston, and that would prevent it from breaking.
     
  16. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Well the lines going to the wheels are 3/16 for the fronts from the Proportioning valve. The in line for the fronts from the master is also 3/16 but it has a funny size nut.
    The rea line from the master r is 1/4 inch but funny sized fitting on the MC and the PV inlet is a normal size but the outlet is a funny size. 1/4 inch line all the way to the rear line. Your pretty well going to need to reuse the hardware from the old lines because they are hard to find. I spent 1.5 hours today trying to find adaptors today to by pass my PV is how I know all this. /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif I was going to have to reflair a couple of them to make it work with the normal hardware
    Now I'm not sure about this but I think that stainless steel line has to be flaired at a different pitch and will require some special fitting as well as a special flaire tools. Something about the angle is to much for stainless or it can't do the double flair without cracking. I would find out about that before ordering the line.
    The way I look at it is the steel lasted 20+ years and the likelyhood of you having the truck when it needs to redone again is pretty slim.
    The line had the problem in the first place from lack of maintance. Brake fluid is good for about 2 years (about what most people average on brake pads) and then should be changed. The fluid absorbs moisture from the air and becomes acidic and starts to eat the lines. The second thing is the moisture lowers the boiling point and increases the chance of brake fade.
     
  17. K05Aggie

    K05Aggie 1/2 ton status

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    Arteriosclerosis is only the hardening of the walls of the artery, as Grimmy stated. The buildup of cholesterol in arteries is called atherosclerosis.
     

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