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How to measure ride height

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by Stephen, Dec 13, 2000.

  1. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    Ok, sagging blazers have been a pretty hot topic recently, so here's how to figure out just how it's sitting.
    First thing is the body is cut lower around the rear fender opening, so you can't use that as a guide. That combined with the hard top makes K5s and Subs look like they sit low even when level. True level is when the top of the bed is level, or when the body crease is level.

    Now to measure it. First step is load the truck how you want it to sit level. This is important because you can really change the weight of a k5. The gas alone weighs over 200 lb, so that can change your ride height a lot. So get the kids, dogs, tools, coolers, etc in there (or just a lot of junk to be the same weight). You can't be too picky with them because of this fact. You can tune it to within an inch or so, but any weight change will make a difference.
    Then park somewhere level and put a jack under the axle and jack it up till the truck looks like you want it to. That may or may not be level according to the body crease and bed top, but your eye is the part that counts. Measure how much you jacked it up and that's how much block it would take to make it level. The amount of extra spring to level it is a little tougher, but you'll have a better idea of what you need.
    The reason you have to put the jack under the axle is because the load will change on the springs when you change the ride height of the vehicle. By raising the rear end up, you will take weight away from the rear and put it on the front springs. This will cause the front to sit lower than it would normally and allow the rear to spring up higher than normal. By jacking up the axle, you make sure that the springs are holding up the truck like they would normally.
    An example of this was my K5. I put the custom springs on it and it was at least 3" high in the rear. Turns out the springs were too tall. I took the 4" flip kit off and installed a 2.5" and it sits just fine. The 1 1/2" of drop in the rear took enough weight off the front to allow it to spring up and settle the rear springs a little more.


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  2. coopertwpk

    coopertwpk 1/2 ton status

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    what about side to side height is it ok to shim (as in bolt a piece of steel plate in the spring pack)to correct off level trucks or blazers?
     
  3. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    That will work, you shouldn't have much problem with side to side, if it looks like it's leaning park it facing the other way! Seriously, if it is leaning, you shoul be able to shim it, but I wouldn't shim it very much, 1/2" at most I'd say. Any more than that and you have other problems to solve first.

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