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how/what did you build/make your work bench??

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by arq, Sep 16, 2002.

  1. arq

    arq 1/2 ton status

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    currenlty building a work bench for the garage /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif seems like an appropriate place. i'm using a 1/4 angle iron for the frame then placing some 2x6s for the top, what'd you guys think?? It'll be one of two, i'll see how this one turns out and the second i'll know whether to use more iron or more wood...

    ARQ.
     
  2. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    I used 2x4's for the top of mine, but they're standing on edge and glued together, like a butcher block. But I don't do any of the greasy stuff up there, 'cause it will soak into the wood. /forums/images/icons/frown.gif For the greasy work a steel top is better.
     
  3. An old solid wood door about 1 1/2 inches thick. The door knob hole comes in handy when putting those nuts & bolts back into the can they came out of too.
     
  4. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> The 2x4s side by side is a pretty cool deal, my neighbor did that with 2x6s. Drilled holes through them and bolted them together with threaded rod, then took it to some lumber place around here and had it planed off so it was nice and smooth. Then he sanded it and laquered the hell out if it. Real purty workbench. I snagged my bench from behind a Kinko's Copies, they were remodeling so they were tossing all of the old counters. I got a real nice 7 footer with doors and a nice formica top. This thing is super solid (probably over 300 lbs) and is impervious to grease and such. I wish I had gotten more of them, they had about 12 of them when I grabbed it. /forums/images/icons/frown.gif </font color>
     
  5. bouncytruck

    bouncytruck 1/2 ton status

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    I saved all the old kitchen cabinets after I remodeled. I put them in the garage, left about 4 feet between two of them for my legs. I put 3/4" plywood with 2x4 support and covered it in aluminum from the Boeing Surplus store. It works nice but probably can't handle as much weight as others. The cabinets &amp; drawers are great for storing tools, etc.
     
  6. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    I salvaged a bunch of 2x8's from some free pallets. Only problem is most of them are warped slightly and I dont have a flat surface... it is very stout however.
     
  7. MontanaLifted

    MontanaLifted 1/2 ton status

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    First I built a frame for the top out of 2x4's with a 2x6 as the long run towards the back of the table top and then I used sheet of "fiber-board" from Home Depot for my top. I mounted a 2x6 on the wall with lag bolts about 5" long. then with 3 sets of heavy duty hinges I mated the top with the 2x6 mounted on the wall. 2x4's for legs also on hinges so they will fold up under the table top.
    This way I can fold down my work bench flat against the wall so I can pull my rig in the garage and be able to shut the door.
     
  8. BobK

    BobK 1/2 ton status

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    2x4 frame,1/2" plywood for bottom shelf and 2 sheets of the 1/2" plywood on top.Put together with 1.5" + 3" drywall screws.2x4 braceing under the top to firm up the top.$25.00 in materials and about 1.5 hrs of my time.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Arq,

    I used two thicknesses of 3/4" plywood for the top, and framed the rest with 2x4's. The "cool" thing I did was to triangulate the framing so that it bolts completely to the wall studs, and has NO legs touching the ground. Makes it easy to sweep or vaccuum underneath and less dust bunnies!

    I also made mine about 30" deep, and about 6" of that is used up by the shelving above it. If you bolt to the wall, make sure it's STRONG! A workbench that wide will pull itself right off the wall when you start putting heavy stuff on it.
     
  10. rampage

    rampage 1/2 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Makes it easy to sweep or vaccuum underneath and less dust bunnies!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    You vacauum your garage?!?! /forums/images/icons/shocked.gif /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif
     
  11. Calclips

    Calclips 1/2 ton status

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    The workbench I've got my tranny all tore apart on right now has a wooden top (wish it didn't because of all the tranny fluid), but it is slightly sloped towards the back of the bench. At the back of the bench is a rain gutter, and underneath the downspout of the gutter is a 5gal bucket for catching all of the fluid that runs off. The bench is GREAT for working on anything that has a lot of oil/fluid that comes out of it, as the fluid dosen't run towards you and get on the front of the bench and then on the front of your shirt /forums/images/icons/grin.gif
     
  12. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    I used 2x4's for the top of mine, but they're standing on edge and glued together, like a butcher block. But I don't do any of the greasy stuff up there, 'cause it will soak into the wood. For the greasy work a steel top is better.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    This is exactly how I built one of my favorite work benches in one of my old shops. I got a bunch of scrap 2x4 pieces from a construction site, pallets, and scrap “bad” 2x4s from a local yard (all free). Built a frame out of landscaping timbers and cleated/glued 2x4s to make 4x4s. The top was about 4’ deep x 20’ long and built out of 2x4s laid on the side and glued/nailed together. Used over a quart of wood glue but my total cost was around $30 or so. However, I didn’t worry about grease. I had an overhead trolley (pulleys ran on a H beam) that ended at the wall over the bench. Used it to set everything from axles to engines (including a complete Poncho 455 that got stored up there for about a month till my stand was free) up there.

    My current bench top is made from solid oak door that was taken out when this house was remodeled. It was in the dumpster when we bought the hose so I just through it along with some other goodies in the “shop” before the dumpster was picked up. The door sits on top of a 4x4 and 2x4 frame which was originally covered with 1” plywood that had seen better days. Works great…
     
  13. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Wait 'til you see it. It's cleaner than my house!!! /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif
     
  14. 72THING

    72THING 1/2 ton status

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    My dad made one with a top of 3/8" thick steel, about 4'x10'. It's sitting on top of some old steel racks made of 3/16" angle and 2"x3" rectangular tubing and triangulated for strength.It would probably hold up 2 tons and the whole table weighs about 1000 lbs. We move it around with a pallet jack.

    Will
     
  15. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Mine is simular in construction to BobK's. I have a room off the back of my garage that is about 6ft deep. I built a 24 inch deep bench along the back wall. No rear legs it's screwed into the studs off the walls. I also made the self a few inches lass deep so I could sit on a stool and have some place for my legs. It's about 10ft long. The end in the corener is about 3ft deep for larger items. I came up with milk crates for storing stuff on the shelfs. I also made a very strong place to bolt my vice down to. If I had the room I would like a 3ftx6ft rolling bench with a steel top for welding on.
     
  16. arq

    arq 1/2 ton status

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    thanks guys,

    i used an angle iron as a fram and a 1" piece of wood as the top. the feet will also be iron angle. the problem is that it looks tiny(6'x3') next to the blazer /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif i guess that will work for now.

    ARQ.
     

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