Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Humvee 6.2

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by Michk5, Apr 10, 2005.

  1. Michk5

    Michk5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Posts:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Misawa Japan until December...moving to Wichita Ka
    It seems like these are good deals...but how much does it take to go into a civilian truck with a 12V system?? He lists a few parts that need to be changed, but how much more (parts/misc $) would you have in it to replace a SBC? I have never had a diesel or a truck with a 24V electrical system before so help me!!! I originally wanted a Cummins (more want than need)but the more I read about the 6.2 I see it will do all that I need it to do as long as it's geared right.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/e...d=1,1&item=7967151562&sspagename=STRK:MEWA:IT
     
  2. rd durham

    rd durham Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Posts:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    I'm in the process of swapping in a 6.2L diesel out of a CUCV Blazer into a 1979 full size Jimmy that originally had a 350 V8 gas motor. The starter is 24V and needs to be replaced with a 12V diesel starter. The glow plug system is 12V but uses a 24V converter. I am not as sure about the guy's statement that the "pulleys, injector pump, sensors, intake manifold and other parts are different". I found that the pulleys and mounting brackets are different between the military CUCVs and the civilian engines. I would tend to doubt that the injector pump, sensors and intake manifold are different, but I have very limited experience with 6.2L Hummer diesels. What I found on the web didn't indicate a difference, but since I'm dealing with a 6.2L out of a military Blazer I wasn't that interested in Hummer diesels. I would think your other issue would be transmission. If you are using a manual transmission I doubt if you'll have any problems. If you have an automatic then you will need to at least swap to a diesel torque converter. Others on here have a lot more experience with the 6.2L than I do, and I'm sure that they will chime in and correct me or fill in the blanks.
     
  3. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,163
    Likes Received:
    1,360
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    Well, you'd need manifolds for it. Pretty sure the H! intake would be just fine. The IP should also be fine. The pulley's are way different than what is on my truck and if that pic is typical of what you'd get you'll need to scrounge up alt brackets as well as a complete hydro-boost system with brackets...and pulley's to match. The sensor he is talking about is likely the glow controller

    The one other thing I noticed from the pic is the oil filter mounted horizontally. My 6.2 has the filter in the same area but mounted just like a sbc...vertically. It could just be that the Hummer 6.2's got an adaptor mounted to the block to orient the filter differently. You'll also need a diesel rad. If you're planning on an automatic you'll need the diesel specific torque convertor and possibly the TV cable (for the 700R-4 anyways)

    If you want a manual then you'll need a 6.2 flywheel, pilot bearing etc etc.

    Starter...new ~$150-$200
    Alt and brackets...~$100
    Hydro-boost and brackets...~$50-$150
    12 volt glow controller...~$50
    rad...~$100-$250
    Manifolds...~$20-$100

    If you're looking to swap a 6.2 into a formerly gas equipped truck this would not be the cheap or easy way to do it. This would get you a fairly fresh and likely well maintained 6.2 with low miles though. As you can see, the little bits will kill you monetarily, which is why I highly recomend a beaten up, rusted out running 6.2 donor pick-up. Hell, even if it doesn't run but you get it cheap enough it would be well worth it.

    We picked up a running and driving donor for $300 and used every little knick knack there was from it, then sold the rest for parts. I still have the box from that truck, as well as the tailgate and we re-sold for $50 less than we paid for it.

    Rene
     
  4. Michk5

    Michk5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Posts:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Misawa Japan until December...moving to Wichita Ka
    Thanks...it doesn't seem to be too expensive. I like the idea of getting a low mileage engine.

    Matt
     
  5. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Posts:
    13,223
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    Stevens Pass Highway, WA
    I'd suggest picking up the low mileage engine, then a cheap donor truck with a blown 6.2L for all the misc brackets and wiring. :thumb:
     
  6. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2003
    Posts:
    12,250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    C-eh-N-eh-D-eh
    i am a newbie with diesel but i woul like to chime in an important point.


    PLEASE READ> but judge as you will.

    during the latest war milatary was all over the new and i watch a program on the army and how it uses the same fule in everything, a cool idea, from hummers,to 2 1/2 tons to apc's to tanks, to helocpters so they can swap fule and what not ect.

    but it did state that THEY DO NOT RUN ON DIESEL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

    they run on K-8 a fule made of 95% kerosine Tons of sulfer (there words) and other additives.

    they stated that it COULD run on diesel fine but a good mecanic wouldent let them because it would "dry out seals" and generaly not be good for the moter.




    i posted this question a long time a go and got a few responces that suported the idea that runnning pump diesel was not good for mil. moters HErE CLICKY

    If you run one maybe get some sulfur additives all the time, each fill up kind of thing.

    hope it helps dave
     
  7. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Posts:
    13,223
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    Stevens Pass Highway, WA
    You can also run bio-diesel or a good diesel addative every once in a while and avoid the problems with drying out seals. Civilian trucks have the same problems with the newer low sulfur diesels that they are selling now.
     
  8. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,163
    Likes Received:
    1,360
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    Yeah, Kenny pretty much answered you question. The diesel emissions changed a ton beginning in '94 when the low sulfur fuels were mandated. This left every diesel that was pre-'94 suseptible to problems due to the lower lubricity of the low sulfur diesel.

    Ask pretty much anyone here with a 6.2 and they'll tell you they run Stanadyne fuel conditioner almost every tank. A few stations here sell 'super' diesel for a few cents a litre more, and it has the additive in it already.

    Rene
     
  9. rugger03

    rugger03 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 14, 2000
    Posts:
    829
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    around
    Military injection pumps have hardend internal parts to run on low sulfur fuels, they are better equiped to do so than thier civilian counter parts. It also won't have any adverese effect on the seals, no more so than running diesel fuel in any truck. The military uses one fuel for every thing for the simple reason of logistics.

    No Offense but you should go back and re-read that link that you posted again....Also if you don't know you shouldn't try to scare the sh1t out of people.

    The fuel is called JP-8 which the military uses almost exclusvly for all motorized tactical vehicles and birds.

    As mentioned i always use a fuel treatment. I find it gives more power, better idle, better mileage, and has lubricating factors.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2005
  10. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2003
    Posts:
    12,250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    C-eh-N-eh-D-eh

    i wasent trying to scare anyone, i was giving a heads up to some one that if they want to but a mil moter to look into it. IT ONLY sulfer that it you know?


    I NEVER said i knew for sure, hell i said i was a newb. but i would sure as **** want to know about a possable problem with a moter i am about to shell a wad on, hummm i dont know MAYBR BEFOR THE MONEY IS GONE and I am stuck with a problem!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 12, 2005
  11. Michk5

    Michk5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Posts:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Misawa Japan until December...moving to Wichita Ka
    I appreciate all the reply's...I think it would be a good engine to get and swap all the stuff from a donor onto it. Peace of mind I guess :grin:
     
  12. rugger03

    rugger03 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 14, 2000
    Posts:
    829
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    around
    oh why even bother.........
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 12, 2005
  13. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,163
    Likes Received:
    1,360
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    Darkshadow,

    If you're going to wade into new territory it's best to do so with a measure of humility, and not with a hostile attitude. There are many well seasoned diesel veteran's in here that are worthy of respect. I recomend watching your P's and Q's in here and elsewhere on CK5.

    For future reference "STFU" is not an acceptable reply to anyone here...unless you enjoy playing with the banned. :deal:

    Rene
     
  14. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2002
    Posts:
    722
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Granby, MIssouri, USA
    This very question was asked about this very auction over at www.thedieselpage.com a while back. One of the replies stated that 40K miles in military use translates into several hundred thousand miles in civilian use.

    One of the replies:

    "In the civilian world, an average MPH is about 35. Military vehicles average around 7. This is for "highway worthy" vehicles, not others like APC's, tanks, etc. With that info, you can guess the engine has about 5 times more running time on it, and very little "highway" miles, and that would equate to over a 200K equivilant, mostly idling and slow speeds. Another thing to consider is most military vehicles don't have functioning speedo/odo's much of the time. If you are getting an engine from a known vehicle, ask for the hour meter reading (they have them) and do the math. You just might scare yourself with what you find."

    Another reply:

    "I'm not trying to scare you off, but don't go solely by mileage because humvees tend to be idled for extended periods of time. I don't thikn I ever saw one with much more than 40K miles on it, and they were pretty beat."

    But, another member replied with the following:

    "I recently bought one of the Humvee engines off of ebay. Took it apart and checked it out and it was in very good shape. Bolted it back together with some new gaskets and swapped out the stuff on the outside that was Military only and the thing is a sweet runner. Maybe I got lucky but I tend to agree with a previous post that the military has lots of parts and keeps the stuff in good shape. The motor pool guys have to have something to do afterall. "

    My personal opinion is that the military doesn't pull good running 6.2L's simply to replace them with a 6.5L. They will, however, pull a complete engine and replace it with another one whenever most any problem arises. This keeps the vehicles moving. With that in mind, it's most likely that all of the 6.2L's this guy has were probably pulled for one problem or another. They might have had minor problems, but who's to say? Personally, I wouldn't spend that much money for a 15-20 year old used engine. I'd buy me an old beater 6.2L powered truck that needs a rebuild, and put the money into rebuilding that engine.

    Or, get a guaranteed used engine from a known, reputable supplier, such as The Diesel Depot.

    That's just my opinon, anyway!

    Casey
     
  15. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2000
    Posts:
    4,389
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    PA
    Yep, at the user level, an engine is easier and faster to change than trying to deal with something like a leaking head gasket. Especially if the engine has somewhat high hours; it'll go to the depot and get rebuilt, and put back "on the shelf" as a spare for the next guy.
     
  16. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2000
    Posts:
    4,389
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    PA
    In the mid-'90s the Marine Corps started converting all of their tactical ground vehicles to use JP-8 instead of diesel. The ONLY reason this was done was to simplify the supply chain while deployed. One fuel for EVERYTHING greatly simplifies the logistics tail of any military force.
    JP-8 is a kerosene-based fuel. It has very little sulfur, if any at all. Lots of other additives, though. JP-8 is not "slippery" at all; put some diesel on your fingertips and they feel kinda slick. Do the same with JP-8 and you'll actually feel the ridges of your fingerprints sliding over each other.
    I don't know if the ground-side folks run any sort of fuel conditioner or not; the one time I refueled 4 LAV's from my CH-53E, I didn't see them add anything before driving off. I recall for some of the vehicles, the conversion kits were just some O-rings and seals/gaskets. Other vehicle's kits had complete pumps, injectors, lines, etc. to deal with JP-8's properties.
     
  17. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2000
    Posts:
    4,389
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    PA
    In the mid-'90s the Marine Corps started converting all of their tactical ground vehicles to use JP-8 instead of diesel. The ONLY reason this was done was to simplify the supply chain while deployed. One fuel for EVERYTHING greatly simplifies the logistics tail of any military force.
    JP-8 is a kerosene-based fuel. It has very little sulfur, if any at all. Lots of other additives, though. JP-8 is not "slippery" at all; put some diesel on your fingertips and they feel kinda slick. Do the same with JP-8 and you'll actually feel the ridges of your fingerprints sliding over each other.
    I don't know if the ground-side folks run any sort of fuel conditioner or not; the one time I refueled 4 LAV's from my CH-53E, I didn't see them add anything before driving off. I recall for some of the vehicles, the conversion kits were just some O-rings and seals/gaskets. Other vehicle's kits had complete pumps, injectors, lines, etc. to deal with JP-8's properties.
    As I understand it, once converted to JP-8, any tactical vehicle can run diesel, JP-8, or a mix of the two.
     

Share This Page