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Hvac questions for a new house

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by bad_bo_ti, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. bad_bo_ti

    bad_bo_ti 1/2 ton status

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    getting ready to build a new house and havent decided how i am heating and cooling it, what are your guys ideas, so far i have thought about the outdoor woodburner, it would be ok other than i either have to buy or cut my own wood, regular propane or electric, i am scared to death of the prices i would be per month!! then geothermal heat, seems really costly. if anyone has any prices or anything that would help me out i appreciate it, thanks, chris
     
  2. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    Beings you are building you might want to look into a Ground source heat pump. Groung source HPs are fairly new technology. They can save 40% on utillity bills. They cost more to install than typical heating and AC but you will recover the costs with utillity savings usually in 5 years. Might also be eligible for energy saving tax breaks too.
    Do a search on "Ground source heat pump." for more info.
    Here's Train's products:http://www.trane.com/Residential/Products/HeatPumps/GroundSource/GroundSourcePage.asp
     
  3. Fubeca

    Fubeca 1/2 ton status

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    Also think real hard about placement. A lot of people don't think about the sun very much but it can make a huge difference. Our south exposure has a lot of windows and is designed so that it gets full sun almost all day in the winter - but no sun at all in the summer. It definately saves us some coin.
     
  4. thatK30guy

    thatK30guy 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I second Thunders suggestion of a heat pump.

    We got one installed in our home when we moved in here last Dec. We had all new central heat/air installed with the heat pump and it works wonders. Very efficient, too. Too complicated to get into details but if you ask your local/favorite HVAC installer, they should be more than happy to explain it to you.

    BTW, if you have a heat pump, you can call your electric company and tell them you've got one installed. They should be able to give you a break or discount on your bill.
     
  5. bad_bo_ti

    bad_bo_ti 1/2 ton status

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    yea i was thinking of going that route on the geo thermal heat pump i have heard they are pricey though, i guess i just need to what and see what my final build est. is then decide if i have enough left over from the loan to get the geo thermal, i am also debating on tripple pain windows too. i know the govt gives a 300 tax break for the geo thermal pump. and my electric company give a 600? rebate for any heat pump. the back of my house has the bigger of all windows and will face the south side, need to get trees planted for summer shade!! i appreciate all the help, thanks, chris
     
  6. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    Most of your heat loss is thru windows and doors. Quality windows and doors with good seals will pay for them selves in the long run.
    Replacing the old windows Putting good quality thermal pane windows made a nice diference in my house. It is warmer and way easier to heat. Also take window coverings into concideration. We have some that look real good and are a closed cell design that help insulate the window and keep the heat in.
     
  7. jac6695

    jac6695 1/2 ton status

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    Geothermal heat pumps are a great idea, but only consider them if you will be keeping the home for 20+ years to recoup the initial expense. Also, the repair and maintanence expenses will be higher then conventional equipment.

    I would go with a conventional heat pump, but consider adding a oil or gas furnace to the system for comfort during the colder Ohio winters. I would also add an electric heat package to it (if you have the room in the duct) for the flexibility of using electric heat as the backup heat source for times like now when the fossil fuels cost as much per BTU as electric. Remember, heat pumps are only good down to around 25-35 degrees F, and then they use a backup heat source to meet the requirements of the house.

    Make sure you get several bids on your house, and carefully make sure of what you will get. Metal duct is far superior to "duct board". Pay up for a programmable thermostat if you and your wife work days (no sense in heating/cooling the house all day with noone home). Have the contractor price a humidifier for the system, and I would recommend installing one to lower your heating costs and comfort (adds moisture to the air to "hold" the heat longer, and reduces static electricity). There are several good thermostats on the market now for dual fuel systems if you choose a heat pump/furnace that make it easy to set temperatures for switching between the heat pump and furnace. Check with your contractors regarding the design of the system. Have then include returns in every room. That will reduce the noise of the system, and you will feel more comfortable.

    Most residential equipment these days have a 5 year warranty on all parts, but make sure of that. I usually sell my family and friends cheaper equipment because most of the brands use the same compressors and major parts, and the same warranty. I would also stay away from the higher efficiency equipment mostly becaues the extra upfront costs will almost never pay off (which is what I noted above about the geothermal heat pump).

    Feel free to PM me with any detailed questions.
     

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