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Hydraulic lift suggestions?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BowtieRed, Jan 25, 2004.

  1. BowtieRed

    BowtieRed 1/2 ton status Author

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    My dad and I are considering building a shop for me in my backyard. Where would I go about buying a 2 post lift? What kind of builing would ya'll suggest? pre-fab or build it ourselves out of wood frame? Any other suggestions/plans? Thanks!
     
  2. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    If I was making a shop right now, I'd grab a popular science/mechanics and flip to the back and start calling steel building companies. These mags have half a dozen comps doing them these days, make some calls, get some brochers and junk and go from there. Doesnt get much better than a steel building that you can (with a lil help) put together yourself without heavy equipment.

    get a conrete slab poured (with a grease pit!) and build the steel bldg on it and ur set. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    j
     
  3. BowtieRed

    BowtieRed 1/2 ton status Author

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  4. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    We had a local contractor build out garage. 24'x60', poured cement floor, 10'x24' poured cement apron, 10' high ceilings, 1 garage door and 1 walk in door. All steel siding, it's what they call a pole building. Came to right around 10k, I had to insulate and wire it. I would rather have a lift than a pit. Nothin says luvin like doing drivetrain work while standing up...plus pits are a pain esp if you can't put in a drain.
     
  5. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    Ohh sweet lift, someday I'll be able to afford one.
     
  6. BowtieRed

    BowtieRed 1/2 ton status Author

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  7. thebigdaddyof2

    thebigdaddyof2 1/2 ton status

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    Also, don't be afraid to call your local dealer/servicer for automotive lifts.
    They are always pulling out old lifts and they can be had a great price.
     
  8. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Consider putting heat in the floor. One day when I build a shop, I'm doing that for sure.

    You can heat the garage all you want, cold concrete will make you feel cold quickly.
     
  9. bowtiepower00

    bowtiepower00 1/2 ton status

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    It is much cheaper to buy a building than to stick build. At the moment however, both lumber and steel prices are high, so prices are going to be a little higher than usual. Like Tim said, heat the floor. At the very least, have the PVC ran for the floor heat when you pour it. It will be the cheapest way to heat the place and make it much easier to work in. Decide how much you want to spend at the moment and go from there. The Cement floor, insulation, interior work, etc. can wait if you're on a budget, don't skimp on the building itself. There's no such thing as a shop that's too big or too tall.
     
  10. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    There's no such thing as a shop that's too big or too tall.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I hear that. You'd think 24'x60' would be plenty big enough. But once I put in shelves, air compressor, furnace, office, desks, sandblast rooms, 2 work benches, welders and torch tanks, toolchests, and other misc stuff that building gets small quick. One tip if you install a 10' ceiling and don't heat the floor...put in ceiling fans. In the winter we use them to blow the heat down from up high.
     

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