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I got stuck twice!!!

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by ggallin13, Jul 16, 2000.

  1. ggallin13

    ggallin13 1/2 ton status

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    OK, I went with a 6" lift so I wouldn't have to cut my fenders and wouldn't rub while wheeling. Well, last night I was going through a dry creek bed and my right front tire hit the back part of the fender well so hard it stopped my truck. I was in sand, so my right tire immediately digs in and buries itself. I have a Hi-Lift, so I got the truck out in about fifteen minutes or so, but I shouldn't have rubbed at all, right? I have never heard of a tire rubbing so bad it stopped the truck. My fenders must be angle iron or something.

    Well, I hit another (way more mild) creek bed and the same thing happened. This time the ground was solid so all I had to do was free the tire and I was off.

    The area where we were wheeling is so mellow I don't even need four wheel drive to get around, so I didn't think it would be any big deal.

    I was in the exact same place last week, and I didn't rub, nor did I get stuck. The creek bed I crossed the second time I went right through last week, no problemo. Truck set up the exact same way. Why would I rub now, but not then? The springs are loosening up a little (which is actually a good thing, and expected), so I have considered that as part of the problem, but I am flumoxed. I wouldn't think that the difference would be so huge between brand new and ten days old.

    Any ideas about what the problem is? The truck is going in for my 14-bolt on Thursday, so if it is a mechanical shortcoming I can have it taken care of then.

    Thanks in advance, and thank God for Hi-Lift jacks!!!!

    I don't have a front driveline in, so I am thinking that could be why I am rubbing. Is that correct?
     
  2. 4x4blazer

    4x4blazer 1/2 ton status

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    Front driveline? Do you mean sway bar?
    If you have your sway bar out, then yes, that will give you more wheel travel. You could have also just hit the obstacle at a slightly different angle the second trip, that could make alot of difference too.
     
  3. ggallin13

    ggallin13 1/2 ton status

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    Nope, I actually mean front driveline. I have to re-route my exhaust and get it lengthened. So I don't have a front driveline on my truck right now.

    I am just amazed that I rub at all. It is really bumming me out. [​IMG]
     
  4. KrebsATM02

    KrebsATM02 1/2 ton status

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    I bet you have wide tires like me. I have a 6.5" lift and 35x14.50 swampers and I didn't think my tires would hit either. My sway bar is disconnected too. You are going to have to trim your fenders!!! Good luck!!! - Doug Krebs


    Doug Krebs
     
  5. Shawn

    Shawn 1/2 ton status Premium Member Author

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    Time to hack the fenders! I also have a 6" and my front Dana 60 has taller spring perches so it's more like 7". I run 36x14.5 Swampers and my fenders are trimmed similar to Steve Fox's article on this site. I have the fender trimmed to the wheel well. Well, they still hit hard and this has also stopped my truck. This has also chewed up my front Swampers with some good cuts. I'm now thinking of trimming them similar to Steve Watsons. 6-8" of the inner fenderwell is removed and the fender is cut back more. I attached of pic of Watsons which you can barely see.
     

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