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I need some quick help.

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by vdubbin86, Jul 7, 2002.

  1. vdubbin86

    vdubbin86 Registered Member

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    Could someone tell me what the GVWR, UVW, and GCVW of an 81 Blazer would be? The sticker is gone off of my door and I am going out to look at a couple of travel trailers today.

    Thanks
     
  2. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    I'd look at trailers weighing no more than 4500 lbs dry. I tow a 21 foot Coachman that is roughly 5200-5500 lbs loaded with my 81 jimmy and I wouldn't be comfortable with anything bigger than that.

    Make sure to use a weight distributing hitch too. Short tow vehicles are not ideally suited to the task, but a good weight distributing hitch set-up makes up for that. I've never had any real trouble with sway using that system. I also find tandem axle trailers are more stable to tow...

    As for the sticker...I don't have one either.

    Rene
     
  3. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    If you look in the links post there will be a couple links to a slosh site that has all the dealer sales pamphlets. It's something like www.slosh.com/brochures or something close to that.
    I agree. While a Subruban with the same drivetrain is rated 10,000lb with a class IV hitch the short wheel base is the problem, not the drivetrain. I agree with Rene', 5k or so is a reasonable safe weight. I have towed about 6k for a short distance at surface street speeds. I could see hwy travel and a emergency manuver becoming a real scary prospect. The trailer can out power the wheelbase in a hurry. For heavy weights the longer the wheel base the better.
     
  4. vdubbin86

    vdubbin86 Registered Member

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    Ok. Thanks guys. The one I am looking at getting is 3870 dry so I should be good then.

    Weight distributing hitch?? I have a recaiver on my truck. Wouldn't that be good enough?
     
  5. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Well it depends on the tounge weight. Probably be fine with that sort of weight if your not exceeding the tounge weight. Most tounge weights are max 500lb. should be stamped on your draw bar or reciever. If your around 150-200 you will probably be fine. On the low end I would make sure you stay over 75lb tounge weight. Where the weight distributing hitch shines is heavy toung loads. It levels out the tow vehicle. Most also have attachments for sway control so another big plus to help with the short wheel base.
     
  6. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Tongue weight on a travel trailer is typically 10% on the overall weight. Your tongue weight would be roughly 400lbs which you'll really feel over bumps. The back end will compress a fair bit and then the trailer will pick up the back end of the truck on rebound. This leads to all sorts of crappy towing experiences.

    A pick-up is sprung more stiffly in the rear and would do OK with that tongue weight. IMHO a Blazer should have a weight distributing hitch for that type of load. You won't regret it...

    Rene
     

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