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Identifying a forged crank?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by sled_dog, May 18, 2003.

  1. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    How could I identify a forged crank? My dad's one friend looked at a new motor we acquired that the guy claims is a 383( will determine that soon) and he said its a steel forged crank. The guy is nicknamed "butthead" and has been for the past 15 years so every word that leaves his mouth is taken with 2 grains of salt.
     
  2. b454rat

    b454rat 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Well, to make a 383 you need a 350 block and 400 crank. Nothing new there, but GM never made a steel crank for the 400. The only way to get a steel one is aftermarket, and they go for over $500 guessing. Even tho it isn't forged, it still will be a good motor. If the price is right, go for it.
     
  3. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    we bought it already. Got a dirt race car with 350 in it, a fresh rebuilt 350, and the 383. $1600 for all of it. Picked it all up yesterday morning and took the car racing last night. It did alright, as good as could be expected for sitting for a year and having some random jerk on the track ram you.
     
  4. Beast388

    Beast388 1/2 ton status

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    On factory cranks, the way to tell the difference between cast and forged cranks was the parting line on the crank. This line is a "seam" where the two mold halves met when the crank was formed from molten metal. On cast cranks, the seam is very thin, about a 1/16 wide. On forged cranks, this line in about 3/16 to 1/4 wide and is semi-rough.

    I have not been too privy to very many aftermarfet forgings, but I would assume the same rule applies. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     

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