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inboarding shocks... L channel ok to use?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BranndonC, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. BranndonC

    BranndonC 3/4 ton status

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    i dont even know if L channel is the right word, but i'm talking about a piece of L shaped metal, kinda like a c channel but an L, anyway couldnt i just get a piece of thick L channel and run it from one side of the frame to the other, then drill all kinds of holes for shock mounting?
     
  2. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I've seriously considered it myself. The only problem that I see with it is that it'd be difficult to have the shock eyes 90* from each other that way. Other than that, it seems like a great idea.

    What you're talking about is commonly called angle iron.
     
  3. trollporter

    trollporter 1/2 ton status

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    It's referred to as "angle iron" and yes it would work well for a top mount. I've been thinking about this for a while also.:thinking: I would use around 1/4" thick just to be sure that you will not pull the mounting bolt through the metal if your axle is hanging from the shock.
     
  4. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    It would have to be pretty thick....the span between the framerails is significant and the loads on the center of that L-channel would be pretty high...

    How do you plan on connecting it to the frame itself? Some triangulation at the ends might help a little. Also, I have to believe that a piece of C-channel would be a better choice (run it upside down, and then you can keep your upper mounting points in "double shear".) just drill a hole through both sides and use that to secure the upper shock mount, and you can still have multiple holes like you wanted......

    .
     
  5. originalspanksta

    originalspanksta 1/2 ton status

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    it bends. i put 2" x .25" angle as my top mounts, with the top of the shocks 2" apart, and the bottoms as far out as possible, and after 3 trips to paragon the angle iron is seriously deformed. if i were to use angle again, i would put 2 peices back to back with the shock mount between the 2 in double shear.
     
  6. TWISTEDJACK

    TWISTEDJACK 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    It will work fine as long as you design it so you shock will compress and extend without maxing out the travel. I have done this on several trucks and it works just fine. However there are better methods for mounting shocks than inboarding them. But if this is the route you choose that angle iron will work just fine.
     
  7. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    I wouldn't use angle iron for that application. It is not tortionally rigid enough. Basically, angle iron likes to twist if loaded like that will be loaded. I would suggest using round or square tube instead. 1.5" x 0.188 square would be my preference. Or maybe 0.120 wall as long as you spread the mount area out a bit (tie into the horizontal walls), just welding on tabs might eventually crack 0.120 wall due to fatigue.

    edit: I should also say I agree that in-boarding is not the best choice. You loose all roll control. It is popular only because it is easy to get major travel that way. A better solution is kicked forward along the frame rails. You need a very stiff shock due to the angle, just as you do for in-boarding, but it will help control roll rate. Even better is to go up through the floor vertically, but most people don't want the hole into the bed or the supporting structure.
     
  8. sapper

    sapper 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I'v had my shocks hooked up to angle for about 3 years, I used a 1/4 thick 2" piece. Mine sits on top of the frame but i also have a 3" BL. It has been fine on a few trips trough the woods, rocks and mud:cool1:
     
  9. 85mudblazin

    85mudblazin 1/2 ton status

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    It will work but I would use 1/4" or thicker or they tend to bend like some one I know :)
    Shock mount
     

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