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Interesting problem to have...

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by tRustyK5, Jun 7, 2004.

  1. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    A little background...

    I work for a company that builds aircraft tooling (Boeing, Lear, Lockheed Martin, Airbus as well as US defence stuff for Raytheon)

    I'm a fabricator/Welder there and lead a small crew on afternoon shift.

    Our shop has three basic departments, the fab shop, the machine shop and the assembly area. As this is a somewhat small company, versatility as an employee can be the difference between getting laid off when it slows down and staying on while it's slow. Good attitude helps a lot too.

    Our machine shop has always been the bottleneck in our shop...for some reason. Recently the owner of the company asked me if I'd like to become a machinist (CNC) which, as he put it, would eventually lead to becoming the afternoon 'shift charge hand'. I'd be getting paid my current wage to train on the job (I make top rate for this shop already).

    On one hand it's an oppotunity to learn a new trade (good thing) but on the other hand it took me close to 10 years to feel confident and comfortable in the trade I already have. Another 'pro' is that the machine shop is a ton easier on the body then my end of the shop, and a lot cleaner. 'Con' is that mistakes are much more complex to fix...in the fab shop I can fix damn near anything if I have to. More stress being a machinist IMO.

    So, I'm a little torn. Thoughts anyone? Anyone else out there 'multi-trade' certified?

    Oh yeah, almost forgot...there'd be a 6% raise eventually. I'm not sure if that even begins to compensate for the extra stress.

    Rene
     
  2. mudhog

    mudhog THEGAME Staff Member Super Moderator

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    what position offers the most potential for advancement?
     
  3. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    I've worked in a small machine/fab shop before (although I was a drafter/designer supplying the prints). There were a couple guys that could do both fabrication and machine shop work on second shift. All I can say is it was great to have them as friends when I was doing odd ball mods /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  4. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    I'd go for the machine shop.

    I'm pursueing something similar right now. I'm in IT, gravitating toward engineering (RF and Electronics). With the RF stuff, there's a lot more stress, and I think the pay's about the same. But, once I learn it, I can go more places in the country, weather an economic storm better, and be more valuable to my current company.

    I would do it.
     
  5. 84k5

    84k5 1/2 ton status

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    Have a friend who does CNC work. He loves it. Personally, the increase in money and ease on the body would be enough for me to pick it. Good luck. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. rjfguitar

    rjfguitar 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I am a person that tries to be a "jack of all trades and a master of none" for the most part because I like knowing that I can do more than just one thing. I would say go for it.
     
  7. shane74

    shane74 1/2 ton status

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    These days, vesatility is the key. I have seen guys that have been doing welding/metal fabricating for 20+ years get let go recently. They were DAMN GOOD at it too. The guys who "absorbed" /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif their jobs are 1/2 as good at best. The reason they got to stay is because they could do more than 1 thing. They aren't the best at any particular skill, but they are "good enough to keep us going". I feel bad for the guys who got let go, but I can understand the logic behind the decision.

    Also, by learning something new, you make yourself more employable in the future. The more you know, the better off you can be. Remember, EVERYTHING you have can be taken away from you. They only thing that can't is the knowledge in your head. Learn as much as you can as fast as you can. it'll pay off in the long run. /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif
     
  8. K5Jimmy

    K5Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    Most growth occurs outside your comfort zone....complacency is being content with mediocrity...the risk and responsibility will pay off later in ways you couldn't think of at this point...I don't see a dilemma here
     
  9. Redfrog

    Redfrog 1/2 ton status

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    I say do it, CNC machines are fairly easy to learn and
    once you get used to it you will wonder why you did not do it sooner,
     
  10. Skigirl

    Skigirl 1/2 ton status

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    Hi Rene! Go for the machine job but you should get more than 6% once trained. Negotiate for 10%. You also have what it takes to be a manager or foreman (which helps a lot as you get older - for your body's sake). So the more you know, the more obvious a choice you will be in management's eyes. And as the other guys have mentioned, more employable.

    I would notice you for foreman work right away. You're a smart guy, Rene. You'll do fine.

    BTW I'm in Texas at the moment - and recently in Cincinnati. Be back this weekend for a few weeks before I go to Erie, PA. Will talk to you then and catch up, K?
     
  11. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    I'd jump on the CNC opportunity. As said before, being "multi-talented" can be the difference between being employed or looking in from the wrong side of the fence.
    I've been in aviation for nearly 11 years, mostly military but some civilian. Currently unemployed but driving a limo part-time. I'm seriously considering going to school to do something in the medical field. It's interesting, easier on the bod, and cheaper too (no tools to buy...).
     
  12. Derf00

    Derf00 1/2 ton status

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    Rene,

    I'd go for it, I see several positivies about the move. First, companys generally don't invest additional training in someone and then let them go as quick when things slow down. Second, less physical stress on the ole bod, that can be a real plus, more money is always a plus, and lastly, you have another acquired skill that makes you more valuable if you did get laid off.
     
  13. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    what position offers the most potential for advancement?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    In the Fab shop I've gone about as far as I can unless the foreman quits or dies, in the machine shop there is a fairly big hole that can be, and needs to be filled.

    Rene
     
  14. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I'd go for the machine shop.

    I'm pursueing something similar right now. I'm in IT, gravitating toward engineering (RF and Electronics). With the RF stuff, there's a lot more stress, and I think the pay's about the same. But, once I learn it, I can go more places in the country, weather an economic storm better, and be more valuable to my current company.

    I would do it.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Lay-offs in our machine shop are almost unheard of, especially with the CNC stuff. That was a point brought up by my boss...

    Rene
     
  15. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Most growth occurs outside your comfort zone....complacency is being content with mediocrity...the risk and responsibility will pay off later in ways you couldn't think of at this point...I don't see a dilemma here

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Damn you JD... /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    If I think back on the things I do now that mean the most to me, all of them involved an adjustment period that was way outside my 'comfort zone'. Everything from fatherhood to my current work skills, to navigating the internet.

    Unfortunately the only job security I really have is the security I can create by becoming as well rounded and versatile as I possibly can.

    Hopefully I'm not fulfilling the Peters principle here

    " Peter's Principle:
    In an organization, each person
    rises to the level of his own incompetence."

    Thanks all! /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif

    Rene
     
  16. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Go for the machine job but you should get more than 6% once trained. Negotiate for 10%.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    There isn't much to negotiate here, top rate is top rate and I already make that. The 6% is a predetermined 'bonus' for the proposed supervisory role I'd eventually be dropped into. The only way to make 10% more is to become the general shop foreman...and there are two guys already sharing that job.

    [ QUOTE ]
    Will talk to you then and catch up, K?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Shoot me a pm when you get time.../forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Rene
     
  17. mudhog

    mudhog THEGAME Staff Member Super Moderator

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    i would definitely go for it /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif you can advance there. you can learn more to further your career. and IF you ever do loose that job you will have more experience for other jobs
     
  18. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    As said before, being "multi-talented" can be the difference between being employed or looking in from the wrong side of the fence.
    I've been in aviation for nearly 11 years, mostly military but some civilian. Currently unemployed

    [/ QUOTE ]

    For the record I have been 'laid off' from this place 4 times in less than 4 years. The shortest was for 2 days, the longest stretch was 6 months. It's never any fun, and no raise in pay can overcome even just a few weeks at home. I've been lucky to work the last 16 months straight, and I want that to continue.

    Good luck with your job seach Ken!

    Rene
     
  19. nvrenuf

    nvrenuf NONE shall pass! Premium Member

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    Since you've been laid off and rehired 4 times they obviously love you. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif Could it be that the owner is trying to protect you from another potential lay off by moving you to a more valuable position? /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif
     
  20. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Hmmmm...not really. The fab shop is gonna be swamped the next year at least. His interests are self serving, and if it benefits me than that is secondary (to him). He feels it will be easier to hire another fabricator than it will be to find another machinist. Plus he feels it'll be easier to train someone like myself to be a machinist than to find 'the right guy'.

    There is a real shortage of machinists here, which means the guys that do get hired are the bottom of the barrel because anyone that is any good is working. We've had some crazy turnover in the machine shop the last 2 years.

    Rene
     

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