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Is This Worth Keeping?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by k5 beast, Nov 10, 2005.

  1. k5 beast

    k5 beast Registered Member

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    I was given a lincoln quick weld welder. Its an arc welder with a 20%duty cycle, 70 amp output,17volt output. It is supposed to weld up to 1/8 inch. Does anyone have an opinion on this unit.
     
  2. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    Hell yeah cant beat the price.
     
  3. guido666

    guido666 1/2 ton status

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    It's small, but better then duct tape (the lack of welder) that you may have otherwise. :p:
     
  4. Leper

    Leper 1/2 ton status

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    Learn to weld with it, it will make you a good welder later.
     
  5. JSH

    JSH Registered Member

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    The hardest part with the 110 stick welders seems to be striking an arc. Once you get started they weld ok. I would never buy one new since they can't do anything a 110 wire or 220 arc can't do better but they are kind of fun to play around with. I paid $10 for mine at a swap meet. Still can't weld sheet metal with it though-blows right through it. I have had some success welding exhaust pipe and thinner plate with the 3/32 rod. Like someone else said-learn to weld well with it and a "real" welder will be much easier.
     
  6. k5 beast

    k5 beast Registered Member

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    Thanks for the advise. I especially like the one about duct tape. I actually used duct tape for its actual intended purpose the other day for the first time ever, while winterizing my house. When I used the welder for the first time the other day all I did was make holes. I was just practicing with some angle iron. I also got it stuck once. The damn wire either comes out too fast or too slow. Although I'm sure its the operator.
     
  7. k5 beast

    k5 beast Registered Member

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    Thanks for the advise. I especially like the one about duct tape. I actually used duct tape for its actual intended purpose the other day for the first time ever, while winterizing my house. When I used the welder for the first time the other day all I did was make holes. I was just practicing with some angle iron. I also got it stuck once. The damn wire either comes out too fast or too slow. Although I'm sure its the operator.
     
  8. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    So is it an arc welder or a wire feed then? :confused:
     
  9. JSH

    JSH Registered Member

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    I assumed you were talking about a 110 arc(stick) welder but by the specs you listed you must be talking about a 110 mig or wire feed. If so disregard my post. :doah:
     
  10. PhoenixZorn

    PhoenixZorn 1/2 ton status

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    If a wire feed, then you are holding the stick too far from the workpiece if you get stuck, and too close if you blow holes in the metal. You should have about 1/4"-1/2" of wire sticking out of the gun, hold it at an angle that affords you a good view of the wire and the work piece, flip down your mask, click the button and watch the puddle. As soon as it looks red in the mask, start moving slightly. You want to keep the puddle moving without blowing through the metal. Make gradually larger circles at first, until you can make a perfect circle about the size of a quarter without blowing out any holes. After that, start working in straight lines on a pice of scrap flat stock. When you can do decently straight lines with your mask down on a single piece, then work on joining 2 pices of flat stock, first with spot welds, then doing a full bead. Hope it helps a little... that little Lincoln will be your best friend in a few days. =)
     

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