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Line Lock company

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by CaveBlazin, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. CaveBlazin

    CaveBlazin 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Can any of yall give me a few companies that you have bought line locks from and how much and how you like them any other info you think might help. My B-days coming up hehehe need to put my list out...
     
  2. Ned Kelly

    Ned Kelly 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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  3. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    So who has this setup then? I too would like some more info. Could be helpful for an open diff right? Do you just put one in for each wheel, apply the brakes, then flip a switch? Seems pretty cheap for something that would be so sweet.
     
  4. 79Stomper

    79Stomper 1/2 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    There is a few articles in the Center of Gravity section.
     
  5. folkenheath

    folkenheath Worthless Trash Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    I have a Hurst line lock(on my car), it is all stainless steel and rebuildable. More expensive, but it works great and should last forever.
     
  6. blk87K5

    blk87K5 1/2 ton status

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    If what you are acutally wanting is cutting brakes to do front digs, you will be much better off with a CNC single or dual handle cutting brake rather than messing with line locks which are junk compared to the CNC product. When you consider that you have to buy two line locks (2 x $40) versus one CNC cutting brake ($100), that extra $20 gets you a helluva lot more product for your money.

    This is where I bought mine...
     
  7. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    I can see that, but it seems like more work too. I'd rather put it switches than worry about where I can fit those levers. It's kinda cramped in the standard cab, and I'm already planning on twin sticking the 205. That'd just make for too much clutter. Not to mention all the cutting/drilling/mounting.
     
  8. blk87K5

    blk87K5 1/2 ton status

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    I actually thought it was easier than line locks, but that's just me.

    With line locks, they arent near as effective for cutting brakes as the CNC product, which is designed for that particular use. Considering it is all mechnical, there is no electrical involved which definately makes that part of it easier. Yes, you do have to drill two holes for mounting, plus another two holes for brake lines, but I am willing to bet you will have to drill at least that many holes for the line locks. Each to their own, but coming from the experiences I have had with both products, I know where I would spend my money again. Plus, the CNC product comes in chrome for free. :pimp:
     
  9. Ned Kelly

    Ned Kelly 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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  10. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    I just installed a pair (one for back, one for front brakes) of the Jeg's "house brand" electric linelocks on my Blazer. The initial test shows they work good, but haven't tried them on the trail yet. They were about $40 each and then I had to buy a pair of rocker switches.

    My intention was to use them as temporary parking brakes when having to stop on a steep hill or while using the winch. The truck is an auto but I don't like putting a lot of stress on the park pawl. Even though when in 4wd the front and rear tires are mechanically locked together, I decided to install two as kind of a backup system.
     
  11. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    I think I would go straight for the CNC's if I had more room, or bucket seats even. But I am electrically inclined, so that's actually a plus for me. Plus, it would add to the collection of miscellaneous switches which cause people to ask "what's that do?":D

    Could anybody actually give a reason why the CNC's are better? Other than just being personal preference?
     
  12. miniwally

    miniwally 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    The CNC style cutting brake is basically another "master cyl." attached in line with the rear brake line. They split the brake line into two individual lines from the CNC to the rear brakes.

    I prefer the CNC over a "line lock" or emergency brake for a couple reasons.
    1. You can moderate the braking wheel lockup with simple hand pressure. This is for when you need to let off a little to let the tire role or if the tire is rolling you can apply more pressure easy.

    2. They require way less space than you are thinking. You can get several diferent handle configurations to make them work in almost any space. Even in the cab of a truck.

    3. With electric line locks you have to push the brake, flip a switch and then start your turn. If you need less pressure you have to let all of the pressure out then start over agian and don't have the fine control you have with the CNC style cutting brake. It can get very complicated trying to do that many things at once and you just might mess something up.

    I think the CNC is all around a better system than dual elec. line locks.

    I have also been in situations where I needed the front to track correctly but wanted the rear to slow me down and I used both handles at once as a rear only brake. Had I used brakes on the front I may have made the front slide a very bad direction.
     
  13. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    It does seem like they're more convenient. Even if they only take up a little space, I don't know if I have ANY room for them. I haven't ever seen a pic of them installed in an application similar to mine, so I can't say for sure.

    So what all goes into installing these? Since it has to be near the cab, I'm assuming I have to run two separate lines from it back to the axle. Which would mean I would have to buy an additional braided line to drop down to the rear axle. How is everyone going about all this? Is there a way to keep the cost down? I would like to go this route, but I can see all the fittings and lines really adding up.
     
  14. miniwally

    miniwally 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    The way I did mine was to pick a spot to mount the brake in the cab. Mine is between the seats in the buggy. They make one that has one handle and it moves front to back or side to side depending on the direction you mount it.

    From there you hard line from master cyl. to cutting brake. Some people add in a proportioning valve in that line.
    From cutting brake out of cab down frame to a point above the axle in the center of the truck. Drop two flex lines to the axle, hardline to the drums or hardline then flex line for disks.

    Not that hard to do and you have to do the same routing with brake line or electrical.
     
  15. blk87K5

    blk87K5 1/2 ton status

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    If I can fit my CNC dual handle cutting brake in my single seat cramped ass buggy with me being 6'3" tall, you can fit one in your truck.

    To illustrate a little further on what Brandon said, here are a few pics of it mounted on my buggy:

    60667076357_3300_1.jpg

    60667076101_3300_1.jpg

    60667077253_3300_2.jpg
     
  16. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    I used www.mico.com

    Mico's Lever-Lock is what I use to lock my front tires. I have a SM465 and I found it hard to 3 feet on steep hills. It's real nice to beable to lock the front tires then free up my feet for throttle and clutch. The lever lock is all manual and has a low pressure warning switch you can hook to a buzzer or light if you like. It is not intended to be used as an parking brake as the pressure in the lines will fade in time, I set mine over night as a test and it still held in the am when I removed the blocks from the tires. I only use mine for short intervals anway so works great for my application.
     
  17. CaveBlazin

    CaveBlazin 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Wow got away for a few days but thanks for the replies. I will be looking into the CNC setup deeper now and will most likely be getting that. Thanks again for the replies if yall have any other ideas I will be using it for a backup E-brake I will primarily have blocks if Im gonna park over night but I'll need something for a few minutes etc..
     
  18. miniwally

    miniwally 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    The CNC setup is actually a real thread hijack.

    Burt 4x4 has the best product that I have used in the Mico lock. They are a heavy equipment type brake lock and work very well. Not a long term thing but they hold well for a long time. Just be prepared to be in shock when you see the price.

    The CNC deal is only good for cutting brakes.
     
  19. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    Ya that is true about the price can't recal what I paid...mabey 180 or so?, nice product thou. This is the only pic I have..

    [​IMG]
    Goes like this:
    Right hand on steering wheel
    Left hand on lever lock
    Right foot on throttle
    Left foot on clutch

    Ready........Set........GO :D hehehehe I love it:saweet:
     
  20. 79Stomper

    79Stomper 1/2 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Sorry to bring an old post back to life but was just wondering how the cutting brakes work with a locker. Any negative effects if using the 2 (locker, cutting brake) together?
     

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