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LIne lock question for a crazy idea!

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by heaj1, Dec 19, 2001.

  1. heaj1

    heaj1 Registered Member

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    Does anyone know if line locks block pressure in both directions? I was thinking of some custom plumbing of the brakes to (maybe) get locker effects from an open diff. If you were to lock one side of, lets just say, the front brakes and when you got tweaked you could lock brake pressure in the free spinning wheel and get the power to the wheel with the traction. If you were tweaked the other way you could lock pressure out of the caliper and apply the brakes to lock only the spinning wheel. Just a hair brainer. Any thought/ ides/ suggestions/ warnings?

    jamie
     
  2. four_by_ken

    four_by_ken 1/2 ton status

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    Skip all the hassle and just get a locker.
    It is creative thinking though.

    Ken H.

    '86 K5 in parts
    1-ton 44 TSLs
    454 BBC, 350 trans, 205 transfer
    Rust free in Michigan!
     
  3. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    The cost of two line locks you may as well upgrade your diff. Unless you want to try thoes cheaper linelocks but.....

    72K5[​IMG]Led Zeppelin[​IMG]Rock ON![​IMG]
    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Burt4x4>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Burt4x4</a>
     
  4. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    To much hassle. If your wanting to do something like that then go to a junk yard and get a couple of parking brake handles from a VW. Then put a handle on each parking brake bolt it down between the seats. If you drill a hole through the handle then for off road you press the release button drop a pin through the hole and it locks out the ratchet so when you drop it it releases instead od having to fight with the release button. Then when you want them to function as a parking brake pull the pin to allow the ratchet to engage. That's how rail buggies do it.

    Women dig dents and flat paint!
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    Grim-Reaper
     
  5. pcorssmit

    pcorssmit 1/2 ton status

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    Even better, run rear Eldo calipers on the front, and use 4 parking brake levers. As an added bonus, you'd have a front e-brake. Lets see somebody tow that away. [​IMG]

    Pete

    '83 K5, 350 TBI (ex 6.2), 700R4, NP208, Dana 60/14 bolt, 4.56s, Detroits, 3" lift, 15-39.5x15 TSLs
    '97 Dodge 2500 4x4 CC LB Sport, Cummins 5 spd
     
  6. 95 Silverado

    95 Silverado 1/2 ton status

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    your idea in theory would probably work, but would not be practical. many of the newer vehicles with "Traction Control" use that principle with the ABS electronics to prevent wheel spin. the abs detects the spinning wheel and applies that brake to send power to a non-spinning wheel, but the abs computer does it faster than we could even think about it.

    '95 Chevy Silverado 1500
    5.7 V8-NV4500- 3.73 rears
     
  7. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    This is not as straightforward as you are thinking. The first problem is timing. You have to know which wheel is spinning. Then you have to set the right line lock and apply the brake. By this time you may have already dug a hole in your terrain or you may lose all of your forward momentum when you apply the brakes. With a line lock set, you are still braking on three wheels and slowing yourself in an attempt to move forward.

    The second problem is different wheel speeds. Stopping a low traction wheel is not the same as having a locker. A locker makes both shafts turn at the same speed. This brake setup will make them turn at different speeds and will likely induce other wheelspin. Let's say your front left wheel is up in the air, so you lock out your front right and apply some brake pressure. You still have an open differential in the middle, so the braking on the left makes the right spin twice as fast! Therefore, the front is trying to go twice as fast as the rear, which will force at least one wheel to lose traction again and spin. Plus, you are using the brake, so the rear is being slowed down and for as much traction as you want on the right, you have to apply at least that much brake pressure to the left and this means that you will have to give it a lot more gas while you're doing it. You would have to carefully modulate the brake and throttle to get the wheel in the air to continue spinning at the same speed as the wheels on the ground to avoid any additional induced wheelspin. This is OK for a computer, but is too many pedals and levers to work for a human.

    Plus, you want to let that wheel spin and gain traction again once it comes back down.

    ABS could be used to accomplish this. It relieves brake pressure to whichever wheel is not spinning. So apply the brake a little and keep giving it gas. Any wheel with more traction will tend to stop spinning, the ABS controller will reduce the pressure to it to get it going. Anything still spinning will still get brake pressure.

    <font color=green>Today's Forecast: Partly cloudy with a chance of mud</font color=green>
     
  8. heaj1

    heaj1 Registered Member

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    Thanks guys, appreciate the input. I do see where it would be a pain in the a$$. I probably should have gone into more detail about what I was thinking though. I was thinking ( there I go again ) about doing opposite corners (front left to rear right) on the same circuit. The idea was more to get going again once you got tweaked. With open diffs if you keep the momentum up you can usually do pretty good, but once you stop in a (even slightly) tweaked situation it is hard to get moving again. I know this would be a sad setup for the rock crawling bunch, but for mud or trails it might not be too bad. Just something to assist with getting you moving again to re-build momentum. Should be pretty cheap, only two solonoids, one switch, and a couple of brake line fittings. Again thanks for the input. I might experiment a little when i get my beast back on the road (trail). Thanks.

    Jamie

    Swimming like a rock, Slinging like a stock, but not for long!
     

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