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Living in Colorado

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by noahrob, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. noahrob

    noahrob 1/2 ton status Author

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    Santa Barbara
    We have been talking about moving to Colorado and have done a LOT of research, but I thought I would ask some of the folks on this site where they lived, how they felt about it, is their work, quality of the schools, any advice or comments...No amount of reading etc...can compare to the input of someone who has been there...
     
  2. oatsk5

    oatsk5 1/2 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Location:
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    i currently live in grand junction there is jobs i work for halliburton oil feild service good money schools are good from what i remember as my little one isnt old enough yet weather has been wierd this year but i love it and dont plan on moving out of stse anytime soon
     
  3. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    Love it here...there are state income taxes, vehicle registration is based on year/value of vehicle, not a flat rate. Weather is awesome (I love it at least).

    Honestly, there is a bit of feeling that you are an intruder when you are from out of state (especially from California or Texas. I catch an awful lot of crap about being from Texas.) It goes away after a while, I guess. I still hear it and it's been over 6 months.

    Why exactly do you want to move here is a good question to ask...

    Thornton is a suburb of Denver, north of downtown. Pretty nice towards the North side of Thornton. Commerce City and Federal Heights are more ghetto. Aurora is the largest, the crime is rising faster there as well.
     
  4. mrk5

    mrk5 The Sticker Guy Moderator Vendor GMOTM Winner Author

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    Grew up in Colorado. I lived out of state for 6 years while I was in the Navy. Actually live in Florida, Idaho, and Virginia during that time. Colorado was the place we wanted to come back to when I was dicharged, and so that is where I live now.
     
  5. Capman2k

    Capman2k 3/4 ton status

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    I've said it before...

    Colorado is the best state in this country, period. #2, even with the large amounts of complaining I do about it, is Wyoming.

    That said...

    I'm one of those people who contributes to making Californians and Texans feel like intruders... There are enough of those types...

    But for a CK5er... I won't say anything if you don't tell all the dang liberal hippy morons running around California that they can move here and take over...
     
  6. chevyfumes

    chevyfumes Court jester

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    Watch for the muzzleflash!
    Bwahahahaha, carl you never get old dood...
     
  7. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    You got it summed up right there...if you can deal with it and not knock somebody's teeth out in the process....it's worth the move.
     
  8. Cricket

    Cricket 3/4 ton status

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    Location:
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    For those of us who have been here our whole lives it's disappointing to see what growth has done to the area. If you like Los Angeles or the Bay area you'll enjoy moving here because that is what the mass influx of new people have brought with them. Traffic, crime, theft, new homes sucking up all the farmland, long lines, high natural gas prices, traffic gridlock, box stores, covenant neighborhoods, et.

    This place used to be far more beautiful than it is today and much friendlier. You had small towns, local merchants, agriculture, uncrowded schools, safe neighborhoods. That's gone and all those towns are growing together into one massive suburb from south Denver to Ft Collins. We call it Little LA. You really have to like living in city to want to come here, unless you get a place to the East or West of the front range.

    We are moving out of this area, hopefully within a 6 year period. That's the goal. I have no love for this kind of population density.

    My .02
     
  9. 3 on the tree

    3 on the tree 1/2 ton status

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    I see that you are a project manager. Guess that means you have to live close to the big city. Too bad. I live in a town of 8K. Never lock the doors unless we are going out of town. Keys stay in the vehicles. The only problem I have is every Tuesday, somebody steals my trash before I can take it to the dump!:D :D :D
     
  10. noahrob

    noahrob 1/2 ton status Author

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    Thanks for the input. In a lot of ways it sounds like some of you guys are suffering from the same crap we have here. I grew up in rural Quebec (town of about 1200 including surrounding areas) and after a few years in Florida moved to Santa Barbara. Back then, this town rocked, you couldn't go anywhere without seeing someone you knew, it was safe and fun...Now, there is a mercedes parked next to every BMW in everybody's driveway (except mine which has a flugly blazer and a 1976 El Dorado donor which is green and flugly...my neighbors will not be voting for me!). I have been thinking about Colorado for a couple of years now as I have some friends who moved there.

    It's scary to think about uprooting the family and going somewhere to start over, but man the median home price here is now up to $1.2 Million. I walked up to someone last year and handed them $200,000 cash and all they did was laugh at me...My daughter is still young and I haven't started making the next kid, although the parts are on backorder, so if there is a time to do it, now seems to be about right.
     
  11. Cricket

    Cricket 3/4 ton status

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    Well if you need pictures of some specific area that I'm near, let me know. I'm sure we can help you. There are good places here if you carefully cherry pick and I imagine this will look like wilderness compared to Santa Barbara.
     
  12. Desert Rat

    Desert Rat Fetch the comfy chair

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    This isn't unique to Colorado. I've seen it happen here in Ca., and in the area I plan on retiring to in Nevada. As large metropolitan areas expand and housing costs rise, people begin moving farther and farther away in the search for affordable housing. This increases the population of small towns and drives their home prices up. There is both upsides and downsides to this. The small towns suddenly see an influx of residential and commercial building. This can bring new tax dollars to a city government that if spent wisely allows more services for the city or town. Some small businesses like restaurants can see a huge boom but sometimes large retail chains drive some types of enterprises out of business. Either way, when the people come, the infrastructure to support them increases. For people who don't like the change, or prefer the small town environment, this is a negative. For people who suddenly double or triple their business and income, it is a positive. For people who want the American dream of home ownership, and who are willing to commute to get it, they want to see outlying small town growth. This isn't a new phenomenon and is happening all over the U.S. Another impact is the beginning of the flood of baby boomers retiring. As this generation retires and looks to find a place to make their limited retirements go farther, retirees seek communities that are cheaper to live in. Since they don't work, and don't have to commute, it doesn't matter where they live, just that the support services they need are present. This will probably be the case for me. I want to retire to the Minden/Gardnerville area of Nevada. Growth has been huge in the last 10-15 years though and prices have skyrocketed. I may simply have to look a bit farther east to the Smith Valley and Yerington area by then. We shall see...
     
  13. mr_blasto

    mr_blasto 1/2 ton status

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    I have spent a lot of time in the roaring fork valley (between glenwood springs and aspen), and it is incredible. I have been coming here since I was born, and I have lived here for the past 4 winters, and it is incredible. I would love to live here on a permanent basis.
     

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