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Longer Shackle = Better Articulation - Ja oder Nein

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BigBurban350, Jun 27, 2003.

  1. BigBurban350

    BigBurban350 1/2 ton status

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    Will a longer shackle in the front or rear give you better articulation on the axle you put the longer shackles?
     
  2. muddysub

    muddysub 1 ton suburban status Staff Member Moderator GMOTM Winner

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    on the front it could if your springs are hitting the frame wen you flex up. so longer shackles on the front could allow some additional flex.

    on the rear im not sure, borrego could probably answer that for ya.
     
  3. Waxer

    Waxer 1/2 ton status Author

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    It wont give you better articulation. It will just give you additional lift and make you have to correct the pinion angle more is all.
     
  4. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    The potential is there even without avoiding interference.

    Long shackles allow the spring eyes to move in a flatter (larger radius) path. In droop, they can move further before experiencing increase in "rate" due to alignment of the spring arch with the mount; after which point further movement is possible only if you distort the spring arch into a "V". In stuff, you don't experience the leverage induced rate fall off as quickly, leading to a more consistent rate. This all assumes an arched spring with shackles in compression and starting from a more-or-less vertical shackle orientation...

    They also cause more tortional force on the frame due to leverage, and the shackle itself must be considerably stronger for the same reason. Also, the increased leverage produces reduced frictional effects, and more deflection effects in the bushings (may lead to damage). And, don’t forget the affect on pinion angle, jacking/squatting effects (depending on angle), wrap effects, differences based on arch and progressive rate, etc. It’s a balancing act and there are many things to consider.
     

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